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Cucamelon

Sabina13Sabina13 Posts: 113
Is it to late to sow more cucamelon seeds? 

I had 4 or 5 plants I sowed months ago which were all doing well until 1 reason or another meant I'm down to my last vine. Each plant throws out a few vines so you read that right, I'm not only down to my last plant but my last vine LOL. 
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  • Sabina13 said:
    Is it to late to sow more cucamelon seeds? 

    I had 4 or 5 plants I sowed months ago which were all doing well until 1 reason or another meant I'm down to my last vine. Each plant throws out a few vines so you read that right, I'm not only down to my last plant but my last vine LOL. 
    There's a decent chance they'd fruit, mine are doing well this year 
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 21,852
    Grew them last year.  Never again.  Waste of space, tme, soil, water, fertiliser - but marginally less so than asparagus peas or Chinese artichokes.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • strelitzia32strelitzia32 Posts: 647
    ...and kohlrabi, the world's stupidest vegetable. Why grow like that, in a silly ball hovering 6 inches off the ground, ready to fall over and snap and grow weirdly, you stupid stupid plant. You also taste disappointingly horrible, with all the promise of an odd looking exotic food, and all the reality of a rock hard supermarket reject. I regret picking you as last year's random vegetable try-out. I should have grown nettles, or left a bare patch of earth to encourage willowherb.

    I'm done now. 
  • Sabina13Sabina13 Posts: 113
    Hahaha strelitzia 

    Was it the taste obelixx? I enjoy the taste of cucamelons I've just never grown them. 

    I'm hesitant to just plant the seeds and see ben, as my garden growing space is so minute, every single inch counts! I'd hate to give space to a new cucamelon plant and not have it be fruitful when I could put something I know will be fruitful. 

    Anyone started them off from seed this late and wishes to share their experience? 
  • Womble54Womble54 WimbledonPosts: 332
    I’ve grown them from seeds the last 2 years and they seem to take a long time to get going, so you may stuggle if you plant them now. You can buy plug plants from some online sites or garden centres may have some now they are opening up again.

    I love growing these and the kids love helping themselves and eat them straight off the plant. Anything that gets the kids eating fruit & veg makes me happy.

    I also put them in G&Ts last summer.
  • Womble54Womble54 WimbledonPosts: 332
    ...and kohlrabi, the world's stupidest vegetable. Why grow like that, in a silly ball hovering 6 inches off the ground, ready to fall over and snap and grow weirdly, you stupid stupid plant. You also taste disappointingly horrible, with all the promise of an odd looking exotic food, and all the reality of a rock hard supermarket reject. I regret picking you as last year's random vegetable try-out. I should have grown nettles, or left a bare patch of earth to encourage willowherb.

    I'm done now. 
    I’m not sure Kohlrabi has an account on this forum, but I’m sure someone can pass on your disappointment.
  • Blue OnionBlue Onion Posts: 2,433
    Ha!

    I quite like kohlrabi.. sliced raw as a coleslaw with oil and vinegar is lovely.  Sort of like alien cabbage hearts.  
    Utah, USA.
  • edhelkaedhelka GwyneddPosts: 1,333
    I love kohlrabi... But I am from a country where it's sold in supermarkets and used to it from an early age. I don't get swede and turnips, it's like something between kohlrabi and carrot... useless cooked (as is kohlrabi, although my grandmother does kohlrabi soup which is really tasteless) and not as good raw.
    Regarding OP's question, I think you are too late. They are best sown in April. You may get some fruit but also a higher chance they will succumb to powdery mildew.
  • strelitzia32strelitzia32 Posts: 647
    Womble54 said:
    ...and kohlrabi, the world's stupidest vegetable. Why grow like that, in a silly ball hovering 6 inches off the ground, ready to fall over and snap and grow weirdly, you stupid stupid plant. You also taste disappointingly horrible, with all the promise of an odd looking exotic food, and all the reality of a rock hard supermarket reject. I regret picking you as last year's random vegetable try-out. I should have grown nettles, or left a bare patch of earth to encourage willowherb.

    I'm done now. 
    I’m not sure Kohlrabi has an account on this forum, but I’m sure someone can pass on your disappointment.
    It's such a stupid vegetable it would probably just ignore my feedback.
  • SkandiSkandi Northern DenmarkPosts: 903
    Kohlrabi is great and shouldn't be growing on a "stalk" but do not cook it, it goes from mild sweet and crispy to soggy cabbage taste when cooked.
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