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Patches on newly laid lawn

Hi

I laid a new lawn with turf in late April and now have patches of yellow, straw like, fraid grass.

I don't think it's thatch as it's only just been laid. I find it hard to believe those patches are dead because the grass is so new. I haven't got a dog, so have ruled out the possibility of dog wee.

I'm wondering if I've overwatered the grass. I laid the turf on a wet day then watered the turf 2, sometimes 3 times a day for about 3 weeks and then continued to water frequently. 

I've attached some close ups of the grass.

Any advice would be welcome.

Thank you.

Ben 
i

Posts

  • AnniDAnniD South West UKPosts: 10,388
    My guess (and it is a guess !) is that it's some kind of fusarium blight.
    Bumping this up for the lawn experts  :)
  • AnniD said:
    My guess (and it is a guess !) is that it's some kind of fusarium blight.
    Bumping this up for the lawn experts  :)
    A lawn expert said the same thing and suggested it might be due to over watering. That was just from seeing the pictures and without proper testing, so theres a possibility it's something else, but seems likely. I stopped watering for 3 days (now raining as I type) and plan to fertilize on the weekend. 

    Going forward I plan to do thorough watering twice a week in the morning, as oppossed to everyday, which is what I was doing. Unless we have sufficient rain fall. Hopefully that along with the fertiliser will help.

    Thanks for the advice.

    Ben 
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 79,322
    I really wouldn't fertilise a new lawn ... especially if it's got a problem which isn't nutrient related (and bought-in turn shouldn't have nutrient problems).  It's like giving a sick patient a big roast dinner ... when all they need is a rest and chicken soup. ;)

     I think your new plan for watering twice a week (especially as the weather is cooling) is a good one. 

    Of course, if we get a heatwave it may need more, but a few good soaks are always better than little and often.  Keeping the surface permanently damp just creates the right conditions for bacteria to develop.  
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,153
    I would say the same as @Dovefromabove. Watering should be done as one really good, deep , thorough soaking, so that the water penetrates right down into the ground. At night if possible, especially in hot, dry conditions, as it evaporates less quickly. 
    Watering several times a day has the opposite effect - it encourages the roots to stay near the surface, leading to problems.
    No food. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Thanks for the advice @Dovefromabove and @Fairygirl.

    Watering plan sorted then, just not sure on fertilizing now. I've heard conflicting advice about adding to newly laid lawn. I appreciate what you are saying about nutrients @Dovefromabove. New lawn shouldn't need nutrients in theory, but I wonder if the stress of being laid and trying to establish roots means that fertiliser would help after 5 / 6 weeks of laying?
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 79,322
    IMHO Fertiliser will cause more stress as it will force the leaves to grow before the roots are ready to support them. 

    Unless you can find a specific fertiliser (professionals may know of one, I don’t) for grass roots Id leave the idea of feeding for now. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • AnniDAnniD South West UKPosts: 10,388
    Did you use a pre turf fertilizer before it was laid ? If so that should keep it ticking over until the autumn. 
  • AnniD said:
    Did you use a pre turf fertilizer before it was laid ? If so that should keep it ticking over until the autumn. 
    No I didn't. It was quite a spontaneous thing really. I started seeding and was getting impatient when I saw a local person selling some left over premium turf. I bought it for £2 a roll and laid it myself. It's only a small lawn, so thought why not.

    I turned the sub soil to get some air and drainage in and then laid a good quality top soil, which is endorsed by the RHS. 

    Since my first post, some of the yellow patches are starting to turn green again, which started to happen when I stopped watering.  
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 79,322
    Hurrah!  Sounds good ... the weather is cooling so the grass will be happier.  I'd give it a good soaking ... a good two or three hours in the evening twice a week.  Let us know how it goes.   :)
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Hurrah!  Sounds good ... the weather is cooling so the grass will be happier.  I'd give it a good soaking ... a good two or three hours in the evening twice a week.  Let us know how it goes.   :)
    Will do. Thanks again for the advice. 
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