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Identify rose?

BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,336
I have an extremely thorny (the stems seem totally covered) yellow rose which might be a rambler of some sort.  It is extremely vigorous and has grown to about 8ft in every direction since I last hacked it back last year.  I forgot to take a photo of it in (very impressive) full bloom but here are shots of a single flower and of the bush today.

If it can't be easily trained, I think it needs to come out so any advice is welcome.
A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.

Posts

  • OmoriOmori North YorkshirePosts: 1,539
    Possibly Mermaid? 
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,512
    edited May 2020
    Id say Mermaid too. @WonkyWomble has a huge one growing right over the large shed at the end of the garden. It’s a brilliant burglar deterrent
    as well as attracting loads of birds and ladybirds.  It’s always covered with flowers. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,336
    edited May 2020
    Thanks @Omori & @Dovefromabove but the blooms of Mermaid are too large I think - these are only 3" across.
    Here are a couple of photos of the base and of a typical cane:


    I wonder if @Marlorena has any idea which type, if not the exact cultivar?
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • MarlorenaMarlorena East AngliaPosts: 6,406
    @BobTheGardener
    Hello Bob..

    ...your rose is 'Fruhlingsgold'... very evident by the very, very thorny stems, which indicate a hybrid spinossimima rose, which yours is...   it means simply 'Spring Gold' in German...  a wonderful rose, if you have the space..
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,336
    Thanks @Marlorena excellent info. and just what I needed!  It's too rampant for the position it is in (and a bit of a danger to the public as it overhangs the pavement), but I have the perfect spot for it! :)
    I will try moving it next early spring unless another time would be better?  It looks like it would survive just about anything so not really worried about the move. 
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • MarlorenaMarlorena East AngliaPosts: 6,406
    @BobTheGardener
    ..Bob, you're an experienced long time gardener, so in that case I would advise you to move it as soon as possible, like within the next 2 weeks.. cooler weather is forecast too and we are due rain... you don't want to wait until next Spring, but you should aim to get the rose re-established in its new position as soon as possible.... cut it down by two thirds.. replant and keep well watered, every day for about a fortnight, until signs of regrowth, then just leave it recover for the rest of the year... late summer it should put out some new growth for next year....  that's what I would do...
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,336
    @Marlorena Wonderful advice (as per usual!) and doing it now is perfect, with all of this time I and many, many others find we have on our hands!  I do grow a few roses but those are all generally much better behaved!  Job#1 for tomorrow it is! :)
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • MarlorenaMarlorena East AngliaPosts: 6,406
    ...tell me about it Bob... it's driving my husband berserk..  all we seem to do is eat..
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