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Can anyone help with my tomato plant

Hello everyone, can anyone tell me what is wrong with my tomato plant? Thank you so much in advance :) 
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  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,059
    You can blame the weather.
    It's got a touch of wind burn and/or sun burn by the look of it.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • demstuartdemstuart Posts: 9
    How can I recover it? I’m getting a Mini greenhouse tomorrow so it will go into that from that 
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,059
    The mini greenhouse will help.
    If your plant has been indoors for a while, then it's gone into the full sun and got burned and winds may have dried the leaves. The leaves weren't prepared for the shock of being exposed to the great outdoors and very strong sun.
    So long as the outside temperatures are in double figures it'll be ok, but don't let it overheat in the mini greenhouse either- which can happen easily. They will stop growing if temps get much above 30c for a prolonged period
    It's all a bit of a balancing act
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • demstuartdemstuart Posts: 9
    Thank you for your help pete, so I’ll leave it outside today as it’s mild today and tomorrow the sun is strong so I will put it in the shade and then when I’ve got the greenhouse build I’ll leave it in there unless it’s a really hot day and move it to shade? Will the leaves come back? Or should I remove them?
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,145
    You may need to arrange some shade netting or similar if you get very hot, sunny days.
    Those little plastic houses are more difficult than glass too, [if that's what you're getting] because the difference in temps is much greater. They heat up enormously in the day, and they get colder at night, so just be sure to open them up completely in hot weather, and close at night before it gets too cool.

    As @Pete.8 says - it's a bit of a balancing act, especially at the moment when your plant has gone out a little prematurely after being protected. Don't worry though - it'll be fine if you can keep a steady watering regime, and watch for hot sun etc  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • demstuartdemstuart Posts: 9
    How often should I be watering them? I have a perfect spot in the garden which is raised but under lots of trees so it is shaded through the day :) 
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,059
    The main thing with watering is to try and be consistent to keep the compost just moist. For plants in pots, I just tilt the pot to judge its weight - so it's a matter of getting the feel for it.
    Tomatoes need sun, sun and more sun so shade is not a good idea. 
    If your only option is to grow in a pot, try and make it a big pot. I used to use 22L, but that's a bit OTT probably, but I always got a good crop growing outside.
    Start feeding with a tomato feed once the first tiny fruits start to appear
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,145
    A consistent watering regime is the most important thing, and that's just practice  :)
    I like to let mine get a bit dry-ish, then water thoroughly. With pots and in greenhouses, you may need to water more often. If the plant is looking slightly droopy at the top, and the soil feels dry, that's when I do mine. 
    Some people prefer to do them more often though. It's more of a problem when they're watered a lot, and then left for a long time, then drowned again etc. That leads to problems with fruits splitting. 
    I'd be careful of having them under the trees though - it could be far too shady and dark there. I appreciate it can be tricky to get the right spot, but normally you would want them in a bright, reasonably sunny position, and then use some shading if the sun is really strong.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • demstuartdemstuart Posts: 9
    Ohh I see, they are currently in the sunniest part of my garden (all through the day, I will leave them there for now, I thought I had exposed it to too much sun too quickly, I will just try and water often and keep in the sun. I could put them in my planter but then I would not be able to bring inside if it’s really cold or but in shade if it’s really sunny. I have put them in the smaller pot as I thought i big one would be too much I can easily put the into a much bigger pot - probably around 30cmx20cmx40cm(depth) however then that would again but much harder to move.  

    This is a photo of my planter (the plants were just put in so they are a little frail at the moment) 

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,145
    I think they've just been put out a bit too soon. As @Pete.8 indicated.  :)

    Small plants aren't able to adapt and cope readily. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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