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Ants in my... raised beds 🐜

mrmhfmrmhf West MidlandsPosts: 345
I’ve just dug a hole in one of the raised beds that I have not yet planted in to put in a trellis and I’ve come across an ant nest.

not sure what to do. Are ants in raised beds with vegetables a problem?


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  • Peter HewittPeter Hewitt Posts: 162
    If I find any ants nests I boil the kettle and pour the hot water on the nest,another thing is they don't like very wet soil,and with this spring been so dry you will come up against it a lot.I had the same problem last year early on when it was so dry but when it turned very we in June they just vanished.
  • koyukanokoyukano Posts: 34
    edited 22 May
    I have 3 raised veg beds, have quite a few ant nests in the garden some of which are under the raised beds themselves or very close to the raised bed. 

    I often see several ants or a line of ants at times going over my raised beds and they have never bothered any of my vegetables (potatoes, beetroot, salad leaves, spring onions, rashishes) so have seen no need to bother them.

    I have 2 young apple trees in between my raised beds and the ants did start to take positions around the flowers of these assumably to protect any aphid colonies starting so I had to put some sticky grease on the trees to protect them.

    Personally I wouldn't be happy with ant nests in the raised beds themselves but I don't think they will bother your veg, though I'm quite new to gardening so others might be able to help more. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 30,029
    Just soak with a hose. They like dry conditions, so will usually move on to find a better spot. The main damage is from soil below your plants being dislodged, and the roots becoming exposed, and therefore drying out and/or dying.
    Boiling water is unnecessarily cruel.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • mrmhfmrmhf West MidlandsPosts: 345
    Fairygirl said:
    Just soak with a hose. They like dry conditions, so will usually move on to find a better spot. The main damage is from soil below your plants being dislodged, and the roots becoming exposed, and therefore drying out and/or dying.
    Boiling water is unnecessarily cruel.
    Excellent. The soil was damp. Not wet.

    Will continue to water it and see if it helps. To be fair, they were very deep - -around 30cm.
    Our DIY & sustainability journey: My Home Farm
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