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RHS Level 2 Theory - advice on studying alone

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  • VeasVeas Posts: 7
    @Fairygirl ah cool, I will take a look at that when the time comes, I’m not at the level for advertising yet, just a fellow student with plenty of useful notes and resources.  :)
    Vivian 
     :) 
  • SydRoySydRoy Posts: 166
    I studied it alone ( my wife did help quite a bit in fairness) then I took the exams at Reaseheath as an external candidate. Work through it methodically and you should be fine. The pass marks aren't that high if memory serves. They're good fun, enjoy and don't get too stressed over them.
  • Hello, I’m am also self studying the Level 2 theory (just started it) and plan to take the first 4 units in Plant Growth, Propagation and Development in February. I was was recently made redundant unfortunately, and now want to put my time to good use and get this qualification. I can dedicate a few hours a day of study each day give or take.
    Do you think sitting Feb exams will be achievable?
    thank you! Oh and any tips and advise most welcome ... :smile:
  • SydRoySydRoy Posts: 166
    Hello, I’m am also self studying the Level 2 theory (just started it) and plan to take the first 4 units in Plant Growth, Propagation and Development in February. I was was recently made redundant unfortunately, and now want to put my time to good use and get this qualification. I can dedicate a few hours a day of study each day give or take.
    Do you think sitting Feb exams will be achievable?
    thank you! Oh and any tips and advise most welcome ... :smile:
    Yes. It will take a bit of intense study but if you have an interest in horticulture already its certainly worth a go. Work through previous exam papers - I found that helpful.
  • Thank you @SydRoy - i am going to bite the bullet and sign myself up for the exams. Gardening has been a long-term hobby, but recently i took on a volunteer gardening role at a school which has sparked a real interest in developing my skills. I hope by starting the Level 2 it will give me the opportunity to progress into paid work one day. Would be a dream come true to leave the computer behind and work outdoors every day! 
    I've just printed off lots of the past papers, thanks for that tip. I've also got the Qualification Specification paper which i hope will help me set out the work over the next few months. 
    I see from the RHS website that the qualifications are possibly going to change slightly come Sept 2021 - another reason that i crack on and get the theory before then!
  • VeasVeas Posts: 7
    edited 12 October
    @SeasonTree
    Well done for wanting to get into paid work with horticulture and well done on doing your volunteer work! Thats great experience! I personally gained practical experience through working with a self employed gardener. After one year of working with him (he has a level 3 qualification - not the RHS, he did it 20 years ago) he encouraged me to do my qualifications if i really am interested. So thats when i started doing my level two. But the point being that I was already earning SOME money doing gardening for small residential gardens by myself alongside the work with him before I started the course. I think that is definitely possible with some experience, I would just say to be cautious and do some extra research and double checking on plants you are not sure about before cutting anything down or even pruning in someones garden. I have found that in the beginning a lot of my elderly customers simply needed someone to stay on top of the weeds and then the leaves in winter, keeping everything looking tidy, maybe with a few roses here or there - great for starting out self-employed if thats the route you are looking into. This type of work will build your confidence, you can do it part time alongside your studies and you just learn so much by DOING :) 
    Vivian 
     :) 
  • rachelQrtJHBjbrachelQrtJHBjb South BucksPosts: 370
    I studied 15 years ago and have the following books: 
    Common Families of Flowering Plants - Michael Hickey and Clive King
    The Cambridge Illustrated Glossary of Botanical Terms - Michael Hickey and Clive King
    Controlling Weeds without using chemicals - Jo Readman (HDRA/Search Press)
    Green Plants: the inside story - CJ Clegg (illustrated advanced biology)


  • rachelQrtJHBjbrachelQrtJHBjb South BucksPosts: 370
    Best of luck to all those studying.

    Knowledge is power and a formal qualification from the RHS should open many doors for anyone wishing to change career. The only barrier is that the end customer does not always appreciate the different between a gardener, who knows their stuff, and someone who offers maintenance, "pruning" everything with a hedge trimmer and unable to identify most of the plants in the garden or know their Latin names.
  • Barry_the_diggerBarry_the_digger YorkshirePosts: 4
    Hi, I completed my level 2 a few years back.

    It's not the only way (obviously) to learn how to garden, but having the theory can really help you understand when things go wrong, and actually make it more interesting too.

    I found Principles of Horticulture by Adams, Bamford and Early was the best text for plant structure and function. 

    The advice about carefully reading each RHS module curriculum. These give you a very precise definition of what you need to know, as far as providing lists of plants, pests, landscaping materials, pesticides etc that you should understand. You can use this as a tick-list.

    Having said all that, I studied in a classroom and loved the opportunity to quiz an expert! 

    Best of luck, don't take on too much at once and you'll be fine.   
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