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New Apple Tree

Just purchased a lovely circa 5 year old apple tree, I got a massive discount as they weren't sure on the variety. Does anyone know? (see pics)

It is badly potbound but has a really nice shape especially once I've pruned the top branches back. When is the best time to prune and repot? and should i put it in the ground or just buy a bigger pot.

Is the leaf curling especially on new growth normal? It's been hot today... 

Further info: owner said it isn't full size and will only grow to 14 feet

Thanks

Posts

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,356
    edited May 2020
    Hi @clarkben  and welcome to the forum 😊

     If it’s a variety that is going to grow to 14’ then it must be planted in the ground. 

    In my opinion it will be top heavy and dangerous in a pot and will never get the nutrition or enough water for it to grow and thrive, let alone produce fruit, in a pot. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,116
    It’s definitely not one for a pot.😁

    White blossom narrows the variety down. Could be Golden Delicious. Could be another white-flowered variety. 🙂
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • Hi @clarkben  and welcome to the forum 😊

     If it’s a variety that is going to grow to 14’ then it must be planted in the ground. 

    In my opinion it will be top heavy and dangerous in a pot and will never get the nutrition or enough water for it to grow and thrive, let alone produce fruit, in a pot. 
    Thanks for the warm welcome, I have the option of pruning it back every year, but will probably plant it in ground, when is the best time to do this? And I've heard that it needs to be pruned directly after planting, is this true and if not when do I prune it, thanks, Ben. 
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,116
    If you have a competent, careful, able-bodied helper, you could do it now. 

    Dig a big circle out of the grass, about a metre across.  Dig the soil through thoroughly, loosening it up until it is soft. Mix in a good quantity of compost to make it a happy home for the tree. Water it very well. Leave it until the next day. 

    Next day, make a hole the size of the pot. Hammer a stake into the ground where it will be about six inches from the trunk. 

    Get helper to hold the pot up, sideways, while you gently pull the tree out of the pot. Return the tree to its normal orientation and insert into the hole, arranging the roots to accommodate the stake.

    Backfill the hole.

    Tie the trunk to the stake with a commercial tree tie or a pair of tights. (Ask the owner’s permission first).

    Water the tree again.

    Remove 95% of the fruitlets. It will thank you for lessening its burden this year.

    Don’t let it dry out.
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • pansyface said:
    If you have a competent, careful, able-bodied helper, you could do it now. 

    Dig a big circle out of the grass, about a metre across.  Dig the soil through thoroughly, loosening it up until it is soft. Mix in a good quantity of compost to make it a happy home for the tree. Water it very well. Leave it until the next day. 

    Next day, make a hole the size of the pot. Hammer a stake into the ground where it will be about six inches from the trunk. 

    Get helper to hold the pot up, sideways, while you gently pull the tree out of the pot. Return the tree to its normal orientation and insert into the hole, arranging the roots to accommodate the stake.

    Backfill the hole.

    Tie the trunk to the stake with a commercial tree tie or a pair of tights. (Ask the owner’s permission first).

    Water the tree again.

    Remove 95% of the fruitlets. It will thank you for lessening its burden this year.

    Don’t let it dry out.
    Thanks for that, will do it when my compost i ordered comes through, do I have to fertize or prune it when putting it in the garden? 
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,116
    No, I’d just mix the compost with the soil until it looks delicious.

    Let it use its leaves to build up its strength this year.

    Prune it in the autumn after the leaves have died down.
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • pansyface said:
    No, I’d just mix the compost with the soil until it looks delicious.

    Let it use its leaves to build up its strength this year.

    Prune it in the autumn after the leaves have died down.
    Okay, thankyou, will do
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