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When do fuschia come into leaf / why are my fuschia all dead?

MisterBoyMisterBoy Posts: 52
I planted 12 small fuschia last July, several varieties all about 1" tall. They struggled initially but recovered well once they got settled.

I am seeing no signs of buds on any of them so far. We're in the NE of England and the poplars and ash trees are literally just coming into leaf in the last week - so is it too soon to be worried?
I also planted a much larger fuschia last year and the same thing. 
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  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 6,038
    Do you know what varieties they are? Many fuchsias aren't hardy, particularly in colder parts of the country. Even the hardy ones will die back to some extent in winter unless it's very mild, so give them a bit longer and if they start to grow, cut them back to where the new growth is.
  • MisterBoyMisterBoy Posts: 52
    I'd have to check but they were bought from a local centre so I just assumed they were suitable! 
  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 6,038
    If they weren't labelled as being hardy, then they probably aren't :(. The ones sold in spring/summer as bedding/container/basket plants aren't hardy here and I'm nowhere near as far north as you. Give them a couple more weeks just in case.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,025
    The vast majority of ones you see in GCs are the non hardy types. Were there no instructions or info with them?

    I think you've probably bought little plug plants [the 12 you planted last July] which are often for hanging baskets/tubs etc.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • MisterBoyMisterBoy Posts: 52
    Fairygirl said:
    The vast majority of ones you see in GCs are the non hardy types. Were there no instructions or info with them?

    I think you've probably bought little plug plants [the 12 you planted last July] which are often for hanging baskets/tubs etc.  :)
    Nah they were potted, not plugs. Actually, here are some photos from when I planted them and the got into leaf/flower:

    https://forum.gardenersworld.com/discussion/comment/2088177/#Comment_2088177
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,025
    It's just that you said they were an inch high, which suggested plugs  :)

    They mainly like a shadier site, so you do have to be careful when it's sunny and hot. They're useful for shady areas, where other plants struggle a bit more. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 6,038
    I assumed it was meant to be 1' high :)
    From the pics in the linked thread I can only read one label, "Sintons Standard", which comes up as hardiness H2 on fuchsiafinder.com. From the RHS: H2 - Except in frost-free inner-city areas or coastal extremities requires glasshouse conditions in winter, but can be grown outdoors once risk of frost is over.

  • SafflowerSafflower Bromley, KentPosts: 62
    I love fuscias but many are not hardy enough for the winter. I didn't realise you could keep them through the winter until my checkout lady at the grocery store mentioned that she wraps all of her fuscias in the winter and stores them near a warm wall I think. I haven't tried that yet but sounds like something to do if you are thinking of keeping them year round.
  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 SomersetPosts: 9,216
    Hardy fuchsias keep in the ground all winter (but I am in the South West) if you keep all the top growth on and only cut it down when you see new shoots appearing at the base in Spring.
  • MisterBoyMisterBoy Posts: 52
    Sorry yes, 1 foot not one inch!

    They are bush varieties but looking at some labels still around, I do see "protect from frost" so I fear this may be a mistake of my own making. Are these then varieties people would grow indoors or bring in over the winter?

    I'm used to fuschias as big outdoor bushes, I grew up in the Midlands (where we got frost and snow every year) and there were some huge ones in the garden! I shall have to research better next time. It's not like we even had more than a few light frosts this winter either.
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