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Festuca intense blue seeds.

ThebigeasyThebigeasy Posts: 190
Got 4 of these with each having a few stalks of seeds. How easy to sow seeds from these to save buying more plants. 

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  • mikeymustardmikeymustard Posts: 495
    https://homeguides.sfgate.com/plant-blue-festuca-grass-seed-33112.html 
    Not sure how to link on this forum, sorry. I don't know what variety I have in my blue/grey combo pot, but it doesn't even look close to blue this year   :/
  • ThebigeasyThebigeasy Posts: 190
    https://homeguides.sfgate.com/plant-blue-festuca-grass-seed-33112.html 
    Not sure how to link on this forum, sorry. I don't know what variety I have in my blue/grey combo pot, but it doesn't even look close to blue this year   :/
    Thanks for the link, seeing as we are still in spring i could sow them just now and should hopefully have some new grasses in a few months.

    Bought mine from b&m yesterday for £6 each, very helathy looking. 
  • mikeymustardmikeymustard Posts: 495
    Just realised it links automagically :blush:
    I guess it depends how long the seeds take to ripen, I don't know much about grasses 
  • KeenOnGreenKeenOnGreen Posts: 1,831
    I have never seen ours self-seed, which makes me think they are not easy to grow from seed 

    To keep them at their best, divide them every year.  That’s the easiest way to get more.   If you don’t divide them you risk losing them eventually.  You can be quite brutal when dividing them

    Good drainage is essential, they hate Winter wet.  
  • ThebigeasyThebigeasy Posts: 190
    By brutal, would you get say 4 smaller plants from 1? Our soil is sandy underneath the top layer of topsoil so drainage shouldnt be a problem. 
  • ButtercupdaysButtercupdays Posts: 4,536
    edited May 2020
    I have some blue Festuca and Stipa tenuissima growing in a very well drained, south facing beds supported by a drystone wall and every year find new seedlings of both growing on the gravel yard in front. They love gravel!
    I would mix a fair bit of grit into your seed compost to help them get off to a good start, but you will have to keep a careful eye on the watering, not too little, not too much :)
  • KeenOnGreenKeenOnGreen Posts: 1,831
    Don't how big your plant is @Thebigeasy but if its a reasonable size then you probably divide it in 4.  The smaller your pieces, the more likely they will be to dry out when initially planted, so give them a bit more watering until established.  Ours don't produce masses of flowers, but they did so a few years ago to our surprise, if only they did that every year.



  • ThebigeasyThebigeasy Posts: 190
    They are about 8" in height slightly less in width, they are pictured above beside the benches. 
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