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Help with late flowering jasmine

Hello! I would really appreciate some advice!

I planted a jasmine two years ago in a sunny spot in my garden and it hasn't grown more than a few inches in that time.

I have attempted to improve the soil (we are in a very stony area and the soil is very easily compacted), it is in a sheltered spot but it's still looking very lack lustre and sad!

Should I be adding anything in particular to the soil to help the jasmine? Any advice would be greatly appreciated!!
Thank you 

Posts

  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 4,676
    If possible, could you post a photo of your plant? There are evergreen Jasmines and semi-evergreen ones too, so hard to know which one you have. Sometimes, newly planted climbers can take two to three years to settle down. Lack of growth may not always indicate issues. Also, if not trained properly, the plants may bush out first rather than climb.
  • samluff84samluff84 Posts: 5
    Thank you Borderline, here is a picture 
  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 4,676
    I’m afraid there is no picture showing. Did you click on the sign that has a rectangle box with a mountain shape inside? That usually allows you to attach your photos.
  • samluff84samluff84 Posts: 5
    Oops! I think i navigated away from the page before it uploaded! Hopefully it’s worked this time
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,145
    Where do you live @samluff84? They aren't reliably hardy everywhere either.
    The soil looks quite 'solid'. 

    You could do with a proper bit of support for it at the moment too. Wires and vine eyes for instance  :)

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • samluff84samluff84 Posts: 5
    Thank you Fairygirl. I’m not far out of London, I’m working on the soil, it’s pretty terrible to be honest, lots of stones and just compacts at the first sight of rain. I’m adding manure when I remember to bring some home from the stables but it’s got a long way to go!
  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 4,676
    Thanks for trying again. I completely agree with what Fairygirl suggests, local climate can affect its growth or lack of it. The soil looks quite heavy, not the ideal type of soil condition for young plants, and lack of training (trellis or wires) to guide the branches. You did mention you have easily compacted soil, so continue to be generous with new lop layers of compost every year to help open it up.

    There are at least 2 branches that would benefit from some horizontal training. Think about fixing wires or a trellis into that fence now. The plant itself looks healthy enough. It may be trying to settle into your soil and over the next year, you could see more growth. Trachelospermums tend to be far slower growing in their early days, but once they get going they can grow a lot faster.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,145
    Should be fine then  :)
    I believe they like nice free draining soil, so hopefully it'll establish over time, and then get going. Many climbers are a bit like that - a few years to settle in, and then they're fine.
    I'm not sure of feed for those - others on the forum grow them successfully, so hopefully someone will help with that too if needed.
    It can take a bit of time to improve soil, but even adding compost regularly will help - if you can get some. It all helps to break down the clay  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • samluff84samluff84 Posts: 5
    Brilliant thank you so much for you time and your help, I've ordered some bits and bobs so I'll get to work on the training as soon as they've arrived and I'll keep trying with the soil!

    Thanks again hugely appreciated!!
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