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Advice Needed - South Facing Evergreen Climber

beckyhalesbeckyhales Posts: 3
Morning,

could anyone please recommend an evergreen climber for a sheltered South facing wall, it really gets scorched in hot weather. 
 I’d like something pretty that can grow large, at least a couple of meters and there’s space for four of the plants.

Thank-you,

Rebecca 
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Posts

  • KeenOnGreenKeenOnGreen Posts: 1,831
    Jasmine officinale.  It will romp away once it is established.  Pyracantha will take a bit longer to put on lots of rapid growth, but it’s much better for wildlife (but has large thorns).  Personally I’d go for the Pyracantha. 
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,287
    edited May 2020
    Trachleospermum Jasminoides - Star Jasmine
    Evergreen glossy leaves and smothered in highly scented flowers in summer.
    Maybe not suitable;e if you live in the North though

    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • KeenOnGreenKeenOnGreen Posts: 1,831
    @Pete.8  I find our Star Jasmine's are much more slow growing than Jasmine officinale, but that might be because the conditions are not ideal for ours (even though they are in a really sunny, sheltered spot.  It has taken years for ours to reach 2 metres, but it took our Jasmine officinale a matter of months to get to that height.  
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,287
    Strange KOG - I'm in the sunny south east and I have tried to grow jasmine and although it grows reasonably well I only get a few flowers and after about 10 years I pulled them.
    I replaced them with Star Jasmines and have no regrets. They grow really fast, have glossy evergreen foliage and the air is filled with their scent in summer.
    I grew a clematis through one of mine which did take over a bit..
    Are you in a chillier part of the country?




    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • KeenOnGreenKeenOnGreen Posts: 1,831
    @Pete.8   We are in London, so no shortage of sun.  I think they don't get enough water, so I'm making more of an effort to water and feed them now.  They are looking very healthy, just about to flower, but we thought they would have reached the height of the 8ft fence years ago.

    Your's looks lovely, even better with that Clematis growing through it, now if only we could get something similar....

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,287
    Yes @KeenOnGreen I've found they do not like to dry out.
    The plants in the above pic are just in a narrow raised bed but with access to soil below. If the raised bed dries out invariably the Star Jasmine gets scale insect, but soon pulls through.
    I lost the pair above when I extended the house last year, but I now have a big (10 x 15ft) west facing wall to cover and soon as I can I'm going to get a Star Jasmine to cover it
    The clematis was Julia Correvon.
    In the spring I cut it back to the base and pulled it off the SJ (it mainly attaches to the front so quite easy) and within a few weeks the clematis shoots up over the SJ again before bursting into flower. They both seemed to co-exist quite happily.


    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 4,700
    What type of soil do you have? Or are you thinking of growing them in containers. Some wall shrubs can be ideal in free draining soil or in large containers.

    Solanum Crispum ‘Glasnevin’ will grow pretty fast. 

    Solanum Laxum ‘Album’ even faster, will need containing in later years but can retain their leaves well in winter. 

    Abelia Floribunda will also do well, with added bonus of having a nice glossy foliage. 

    There are others that are capable of growing larger, but I'm not sure with what you meant by space for 4. Did you mean each plant to grow to 2-3 meters or only that space for 4 plants.
  • beckyhalesbeckyhales Posts: 3
    Wow, thanks for so much advice. We are in the South so a milder climate and I want the plants to climb our house to hide an unsightly 70s extension, the bricks don’t match. 



    We have a dark rich soil here and I am going to top the beds up with well rotted manure at the end of the year and plant something then. I wish that clematis was evergreen, it’s lovely!



    Rebecca 
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,789
    Are you intending planting them in those beds in the photo?
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • beckyhalesbeckyhales Posts: 3
    I actually prefer paler and more “boring” colours, I always come back to white usually so maybe the clematis will suit me after all, thank you!

    Yes I am planting them in the beds against the house, they seem to be deep although they do get very dry in hot weather. 
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