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Cherry Tree Problem

I planted a dwarf cherry tree last year. So far this season, it has leafed and blossomed up lovely and has quite a lot of cherry's forming. However, the upper part of the tree is now looking decidedly sick and the leaves and cherry's are shrivelling up/dying.

Any budding gardeners out there that can offer me advice as to what treatment I can give the tree please? I don't think it is related, but last Autumn, the tree got blackfly, which I treated with a proprietary product.

Many thanks in advance.

Posts

  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,337
    Can we see a photo of the whole tree please?
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • paul.uphampaul.upham Posts: 3
    Thanks for your reply Bob - here is a pic of the full tree.
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,337
    edited May 2020
    Hmm, doesn't look good.  I think it may have some disease such as fire blight, silver leaf etc.  I think your only recourse is to cut the affected parts off, pruning back into healthy wood, just above a shoot, side branch or bud.  None of the many diseases which cause this sort of thing on cherries can be controlled by chemical treatments which leaves little choice.  I would start by cutting into a part of the affected growth and examine it for any staining of the wood inside (a photo of that would also be useful.)  Anything but pure white wood is not good.  If you do decide to prune out the damage, disinfect the secateurs between each cut to avoid spreading it further.
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • paul.uphampaul.upham Posts: 3
    Thanks again for your advice Bob. I have chopped a couple of branches off, as per new pic. From what you are saying, I assume the larger branch cut back, is still showing signs of disease? 
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,337
    edited May 2020
    Yes, that brown core indicates a Silver Leaf infection in my opinion.
    which has alink specifically to SL:
    This disease can enter if prunus species are pruned while dormant (cherries, plums and other prunus should only normally be pruned in summer.)
    I would contact the supplier and send them that photo as the tree could already have been infected before you got it.  Hopefully they will agree and replace/refund.
    If you want to save it regardless, you will need to keep pruning back until the brown stain in the core has gone, then cut back a further 2 inches into clean wood to hopefully be safe.


    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
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