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Boiling water on Gorse seed??

I was reading about Gorse, in respect of the seeds.

 The pre sowing  preparation instruction was to pour boiling water on the seed to 'damage' the hard seed casing, thus to allow air and moisture to penetrative.

It is not something I have come across, and seems an unusual procedure.

Anyone heard of this boiling water treatment in respect of seeds? 🤔

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  • It must be correct. Just seen it mentioned on this other site too.
    https://www.nature-and-garden.com/gardening/gorse-flower-care-watering.html
  • ButtercupdaysButtercupdays Posts: 4,531
    In that case I have no idea why there are so many gorse bushes in our sheep paddock up here in the hills!
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,717
    edited April 2020
    Don't know how it manages to multiply like mad up here then!  :D

    It would seem, reading your link, that it's merely to burst the shell of the seed initially.
    I couldn't be bothered with that really. I'd stick with how things grow in nature as much as possible.  :)

    It would seem to be an American site though - so not surprising really  ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,275
    I've heard of pouring boiling water into a drill before sowing parsley outside - but I've never done it.
    I would imagine that leaving a small seed in water at 100C for 30 seconds is going to kill it, but there's only one way to find out...

    I have used the sandpaper method on sweet peas, I'm not sure it made much difference to germination.

    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,717
    I used to do that 'back in the day' @Pete.8, as it was always being recommended, as well as the 'soaking overnight' thing.
    I don't do either now - waste of time and effort. The best method of germination is to buy good quality seed, and sow at an appropriate time.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,717
    Maybe we should send him a wee tweet @philippa smith2 :D
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • In that case I have no idea why there are so many gorse bushes in our sheep paddock up here in the hills!
    Apparently some Gorse seed can take 4 years to germinate in the wild. Young plants that we see growing may well have come from seeds dispersed a few years previously. 

    The original article about boiling water was just to speed things up.



  • It would seem, reading your link, that it's merely to burst the shell of the seed initially.

    It would seem to be an American site though - so not surprising really  ;)
    Yes it is to weaken the outer coating of the seed.

    It is the second site that has mentioned this. I was unsure of the authenticity on the first site. It's all knowledge.
  • Ladybird4Ladybird4 Posts: 37,705
    In its natural state, where gorse grows, the moors were regularly set on fire to burn off the brash each year and this treatment used to stimulate the germination of the tough coated seeds of the gorse so failing a fire the boiling water treatment has a similar effect
    Cacoethes: An irresistible urge to do something inadvisable
  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 30,000
    Why do you want to germinate gorse seed?

    It's a heath plant that likes poor soil.  It has nasty yellow flowers in winter and early spring and vicious thorns.  There are more attractive plants to use to keep out unwanted visitors.
    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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