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Everlasting sweet pea?

KmehKmeh Posts: 130
Generally wanted to get your thoughts on them? Thinking the pink pearl. Ease of growing, appearance throughout the summer. Thought they may cover our bare fences while the hedging grows to provide some interest. Would have them in tallish pots. 

Any thought appreciated. 
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  • MarlorenaMarlorena East AngliaPosts: 6,393
    edited April 2020
    ...this is Lathyrus 'Pink Pearl'...
    ..very vigorous if the slugs don't get it.. strangles anything in its path and can get quite straggly... however, it's rather pretty too..   try it with herbaceous clematis 'Rooguchi' and let them fight it out between them.. or with other pinks even, like this sidalcea..

    ..the clematis is in there somewhere... lost out in the battle I think..


    oh here's another shot with Rose 'Cornelia'..

  • MarlorenaMarlorena East AngliaPosts: 6,393
    ...if you like everything well mannered and tidy, it's probably not for you...
  • KmehKmeh Posts: 130
    Do you get much self seeding. It will go in pots adjacent to some very rapidly growing Lelandii (behind the fence) and very (tediously) slow growing privet (in front of the fence). Eventually it wont be necessary - but just looking for a bit of quick and pretty coverage in the absence of the hedging. Any of quick growing suggestions welcome that wont leave a long lasting presence if planted in pots?
  • MarlorenaMarlorena East AngliaPosts: 6,393
    edited April 2020
    ..try them and see, they might suit your temporary purposes... they will need something to cling to with their tendrils...   you could try with it the purple flowered Maurandya barclaiana [a.k.a. Asarina].. which is easily grown from seed as an annual plant... I used to grow it every year..

    You asked about self seeding, no I can't say I've noticed any, but I do weed regularly, so nothing much escapes me..
  • Butterfly66Butterfly66 BirminghamPosts: 736
    We inherited it in our current garden and I don’t recall it ever self-seeding. I don’t know the variety we had but it flowered continually all summer but didn’t cope well with rain - the flowers, open and in bud, would brown and fail to open - havung said that they were quickly replaced with new. It didn’t need deadheading unlike annual sweet peas so easy care.

    Probably good in pots, ours was in a very dry narrow bed against the house wall and was competing with a mature wisteria and we never fed or watered it.
     If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.”—Marcus Tullius Cicero
  • herbaceousherbaceous E. BerksPosts: 2,278
    My Mother -in-Law planted some in my garden (no idea what variety) and they self seed they also took over the fence and were trying for the next border along.  Sadly she is no longer with us and I have been trying to get rid of them with some success, another couple of years and I might win.

    They are lovely and I do enjoy them but they have very deep roots.
    "The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett
  • B3B3 Posts: 21,525
    They took over a garden a few streets away from me but I can't even get one to grow . Although one did pop up in the middle of a path. That didn't survive either😕
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • herbaceousherbaceous E. BerksPosts: 2,278
    That may be a blessing in disguise @B3 
    "The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett
  • B3B3 Posts: 21,525
    Probably😊
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • AuntyRachAuntyRach Posts: 4,477
    I have one in a pot. Very reliable, hardy and blooms well. The bottom half does get a bit untidy towards the end of the season though. They would help cover a fence well. 
    Mine is not scented, but not sure if that is the case for all perennial sweet peas?? 
    My garden and I live in South Wales. 
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