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Herbs to grow in dappled shade?

vanessajanenorrisvanessajanenorris South London Posts: 20
I have a patch in my garden in dappled shade which l’m considering what to do with.  I’d really like to introduce some herbs that will look after themselves such as mint or lemonbalm.  Will these do well in shade?  Does anyone have any other ideas for similar herbs l could try?  Thanks for your help 👍
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  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,632
    Both of those are seriously invasive - mint from runners and lemon balm from seedlings so I would reconsider and put them in pots where they can be controlled.   Chervil is a lovely, slightly aniseedy herb which is good with fish.   Sweet cicely is much larger and has frothy white flowers and can be used for cooking with sour fruits like rhubarb and blackcurrants to reduce the amount of sugar needed.   Parsley and chives also do well in dappled shade. 
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Butterfly66Butterfly66 BirminghamPosts: 736
    I’ve grown Rosemary in dappled shade and it did surprisingly well. Needs to have well drained soil though so no good for a shady, damp area. I’ve also got Oregano which has done well in partial shade probably gets a couple of hours sun maximum - it’s leggy but the amount and flavour of growth is good.
     If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.”—Marcus Tullius Cicero
  • vanessajanenorrisvanessajanenorris South London Posts: 20
    Thanks for your suggestions- really helpful. Next challenge is trying to get hold of plants or seeds!  
  • B3B3 Posts: 21,537
    Try the supermarket pots. They often grow well when planted out
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • Butterfly66Butterfly66 BirminghamPosts: 736
    Quite a lot can be rooted in water. Most of my herbs were ones bought fresh from the supermarket and rooted in water. Easy to do and you get to still use them whilst they root, many keep on growing so you can trim off what you need and then pot them in when they have a good set of roots. Am doing some lemon thyme at the moment.
     If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.”—Marcus Tullius Cicero
  • vanessajanenorrisvanessajanenorris South London Posts: 20
    Great idea re supermarket pots- l always thought only garden centre bought herbs would suitable for growing outside, but I’ll certainly give it a go. Thanks so much for the advice 👍
  • tui34tui34 Béziers, Herault, FrancePosts: 1,987
    A good way to grow invasive herbs is to plant them in a large tin that you have drilled holes in the bottom for drainage.  Plant the tin in your chosen spot in the garden.  This way the roots are "housebound".  Good luck.
    A good hoeing is worth two waterings.

  • vanessajanenorrisvanessajanenorris South London Posts: 20
    A good way to grow invasive herbs is to plant them in a large tin that you have drilled holes in the bottom for drainage.  Plant the tin in your chosen spot in the garden.  This way the roots are "housebound".  Good luck.
    Great tip- many thanks 😊.  I’ve made a start by putting a few sticks of mint from a supermarket pot in a glass of water to see if they root. Fingers crossed 🤞 
  • We have lemon balm in a pot with thyme (huge pot) but the lemon balm has over quadrupled in size in no time at all! Mad really 
  • B3B3 Posts: 21,537
    It can be a pest, but nice smell when you're weeding😉
    In London. Keen but lazy.
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