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Crafting bio-degradable root trainers from bathroom stationery middles

herbaceousherbaceous E. BerksPosts: 2,257
edited April 2020 in Tools and techniques
Just thought I would share the results of my (entirely scientific) experiment making pots for my next sowing of peas.

Watching Kirsty Wilson on Beechgrove she advised 5 slanted cuts into the bottom of the tube and then squash into the middle.    I normally make four straight cuts and do a bit of weaving to close up the bottom but I am changing now as Kirsty wins hands down. Much easier and more forgiving if the depth of cut is a bit hit and miss.

Edited to add:  discovering that 7 cuts is easier than 5, isn't this lockdown just such an opportunity for discovery  :)
"The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett

Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 26,221
    I've never cut them.  Just fill a plant pot with the tubes then fill the tubes with compost, water and sow.   By the time the seedling is big enough to plant out it's roots are holding the tube and its compost together.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • herbaceousherbaceous E. BerksPosts: 2,257
    Tried that @Obelixx but I'm obviously not deft enough to transfer the tube before it collapses and spews compost everywhere.  Sadly not very adept at practical stuff so have to make sure the bottoms are secure  :) 

    I always release the bottom once it is over the planting hole to let the roots out and any compost just goes in the hole then.
    "The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett
  • BenCottoBenCotto RutlandPosts: 2,916
    “I always release the bottom once it is over the planting hole ”

    There’s a phrase I wish I could un-read!
  • herbaceousherbaceous E. BerksPosts: 2,257
      
    "The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett
  • @herbaceous : Following on from your very worthy 'crafting' with TRI materials - for several years I've started large seeds eg. Broad & Runner Beans in individual cribs - cut from industrial strength cardboard carpet roll inners. Each 'crib' is cut from the roll, usually 200mm or thereabouts using a hacksaw! The tubes are strong enough to make it out into the planting beds when the plants are c20cms high (Runners maybe a little taller as they 'climb' quite rapidly when starting life in a water-filled tray in the greenhouse) Note: no extra heat is used. *The tubes generally decay during the course of the growing season with a good 2/3rds recessed into the planting holes. I enjoy such 'repurposing' of everyday materials - makes for a good exchange with my professional carpet-fitter neighbour! [his family help devour the crops in due course!!
  • herbaceousherbaceous E. BerksPosts: 2,257
    Ah @David Matthews2 you are fortunate in having such a useful neighbour.  After an 'incident' which involved my insurance company and a lot of redecorating I found myself in possession of two such rolls and I totally get the idea.

    Sadly my grandson had his own ideas about their ultimate fate so I never got the chance to use them but I now have a very serviceable cucumber frame made from the crate the new bedroom furniture arrived in so not a complete waste.

    Recycling is the way forward!
     
    "The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett
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