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Leylandii removal

We are in the process of removing an 80 feet long conifer hedge.
This is part of the hedge. As you can see it has in the past been badly trimmed so that our side had no green on it.
As you can see, 3 foot of trunk left to aid stump removal. Stumps have to come out as they are in the way of the fence posts.
There is a problem with disposal of stumps and trunks.
There is an even bigger problem with disposal of the brash.
The re-cycling place is closed. I am shredding this and putting it on an unused, as yet part of the garden.
Any sensible suggestions welcome.

Posts

  • Dave HumbyDave Humby Posts: 1,117
    We are waiting to have work done on our two huge Beech trees however our tree surgeon has suspended his activities for now. However there have been other tree surgeons still working in our area so how about contacting a tree surgeon local to yourself and see if they will come round and mulch it up and take it away. For a fee of course. It they're finding work light at the moment it might be something they are interested in.
  • PalustrisPalustris Posts: 3,837
    edited April 2020
    The new fence is going to cost in the region of £2000 so we are not in a position to spend more on it at present.
    Thanks for the thought.
    One nice thing though. A hedgehog has moved into the pile.
  • Dave HumbyDave Humby Posts: 1,117
    Are you having the fence installed by contractors or DIY? If using contractors then they might have options to get rid of the waste for you? Most have these facilities as they are often taking away old fencing when installing new. Just a thought but as you say, whatever you do, what out for the hogs and other critters!
  • nick615nick615 SW IrelandPosts: 998

    Recognising your views on additional cost, I can't help feeling you're going to have to face up to that possibility?  The only free disposal method is burning if it doesn't upset local by-laws or the neighbours.  If your fencing contractor has included removing the stumps in his price, that's covered, but, whatever the answer to that, can you get a tractor or similar machine to where the stumps are?  I think another 4-5ft of trunk left on them would have afforded the remover greater leverage.

    If you can continue to shred as much as possible and spread it around, then stack all the larger pieces in a corner of the plot to rot, barring stump/root removal I suggest that's as good as it's going to get?  The man with the beech has valuable firewood to dispose of, but no-one wants Leylandii, I'm afraid.

  • PalustrisPalustris Posts: 3,837
    The extra cost for the fencing people to lift and remove the stumps is eye watering.  Oddly after I posted asking for ideas we went past a Farm house on an extended exercise walk yesterday. They have used logs as a fence along their drive. Looked very good and had plenty of spaces for insects etc. We may do that along our boundary hedge. The stumps I am considering using to make a raised bed at the top of the garden. Could be fun.
    We had no trouble using that  length of trunk to lever the stumps out. No way of getting any mechanical help up to that end of the garden so it was all down to me and her and the chainsaw.
  • SmudgeriiSmudgerii Posts: 185
    Could you hire a stump grinder?  Cut the stumps to ground level and then grind out.

    shed the ‘brush’ and any branches small enough, then use the rest as you have described.
  • FireFire LondonPosts: 14,174
    Palustris said:
    The extra cost for the fencing people to lift and remove the stumps is eye watering.  Oddly after I posted asking for ideas we went past a Farm house on an extended exercise walk yesterday. They have used logs as a fence along their drive. Looked very good and had plenty of spaces for insects etc. We may do that along our boundary hedge.

    A deadwood hedge would be excellent for wildlife - even if only used for a year.
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