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Weeping Pussy willow unhappy in pot.

Received a pussy willow in a pot 4 years ago, repotted it & seemed happy until this year. I'm nervous to plant in the ground of my medium size garden as I heard how thirsty the roots are. However, I live opposite a public park, with a few giant weeping Willows growing along a Stream in the far section, the stream runs under a 'football pitch' (which my house overlooks from a steep slope). The pitch is flooded most of winter so is only used by kids in the summer). Can i guerilla garden and put it there? Not on the pitch, but just up from it- there are a few other mature trees on the slope. Thought it could help stop the pitch from flooding. Alternatively can I repot it to try and save it. I can't bear the idea of it dying or throwing it away.
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  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 33,334
    Welcome to the Forum.
    Can you supply a photo? 
    I'd certainly NOT go planting it in a public park. 
    Devon.
  • Ok thanks. Usually tree is covered in leaves by now, but has only a few &  lots of dead looking branches.
    Wasn't thinking of doing guerilla gardening now, but thinking of after the lockdown?
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 33,334
    Imagine what parks would look like if everyone randomly planted stuff they don't want any more? Please don't.
    I'd cut it back to that new growth at the top and get it in the ground in your own garden. 
    Devon.
  • Ok thanks. My gardens not big enough for a weeping willow. Will see if anyone wants it locally before it goes in the compost then. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,201
    Is it one of those Kilmarnock willows that get sold everywhere?
    They don't get like the big ones you see on riverbanks etc
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,391
    If the pot came from a garden centre etc., it may be an ornamental variety and, if so, some of those only grow to about 3m in a couple of decades.  I would plant it in the garden and keep an eye on it.  You can always take it out if it looks like it's the native one and grows too quickly for your liking.  If that happens, just cut a 2ft section off of one of the branches and plant it - they root very easily - and then the tree will survive from the cutting when you take the big one out. :)  
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 33,334
    Fairygirl said:
    Is it one of those Kilmarnock willows that get sold everywhere?
    They don't get like the big ones you see on riverbanks etc
    I agree, Kilmarnock willow. Not Huge, just ugly ( usually )
    Devon.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,201
    Yes - they aren't the most pleasing item in a garden @Hostafan1 .... ;)
    They're ok in spring with some bulbs underneath, but after that, they're pretty
    nothing-y.
    We had a group of them at the last house [inherited, not planted by me!] beside one end of the pond, and they were useful cover for the sparrows as they flitted across to the feeders. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 33,334
    Fairygirl said:
    Yes - they aren't the most pleasing item in a garden @Hostafan1 .... ;)
    They're ok in spring with some bulbs underneath, but after that, they're pretty
    nothing-y.
    We had a group of them at the last house [inherited, not planted by me!] beside one end of the pond, and they were useful cover for the sparrows as they flitted across to the feeders. 
    we inherited one in this garden, had a prop against it at it was at 45degrees, so out it came.
    Devon.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,201
    I think those ones we had, were of the same inclination.... :D

    Right in the firing line of the prevailing wind.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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