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Tree identification

LatimerLatimer Posts: 1,059
Hi all,

I was given this tree late last year but had no idea what it was (it had been bought in amongst a bunch of other stuff and the label had fallen off).

I waited to see what the leaves were like in order to identify it but I'm still trying to narrow it down exactly. I'm pretty sure it's a Dogwood and my best guess is Cornus alternifolia but I'm not sure which one. I don't want to plant it if it's going to be a huge tree! Could anyone help identifying it for me?

Thanks all!


I’ve no idea what I’m doing. 
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Posts

  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 34,855
    Cornus, maybe C controversa variegata
    Devon.
  • LatimerLatimer Posts: 1,059
    Thanks for the super quick response! Definitely looks like it could be that too.... Which is a worry because i think 8m potential height is too big!! 🙈
    I’ve no idea what I’m doing. 
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 34,855
    moiz.ak said:
    Thanks for the super quick response! Definitely looks like it could be that too.... Which is a worry because i think 8m potential height is too big!! 🙈
    It's a fabulous thing, and they're usually V expensive. 
    Not fast growing so I'd give it a much space as you've got and enjoy it. 
    Devon.
  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 4,709
    Leaves to me appear to be alternate...therefore it would be Cornus alternifolia argentea.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=cornus+alternifolia+argentea&client=firefox-b-d&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiIgOrSx-LoAhVCVRUIHWHsAgEQ_AUoAnoECA8QBA&biw=1920&bih=944

    Cornus contraversa has opposite leaves.
    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • LatimerLatimer Posts: 1,059
    Thanks both of you for your input!

    It's a fabulous thing, and they're usually V expensive. 
    Not fast growing so I'd give it a much space as you've got and enjoy it. 
    This one definitely was expensive, there's a £250 sticker on the pot which is why is definitely like to use it if i can as I'll never afford to buy something of that price!

    So what's my next step in identifying this? Do i wait for it to flower?
    I’ve no idea what I’m doing. 
  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 4,709
    edited April 2020
    moiz.ak said:
    Thanks both of you for your input!



    So what's my next step in identifying this? Do i wait for it to flower?
    Leaves to me appear to be alternate...therefore it would be Cornus alternifolia argentea.
    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 34,855
    moiz.ak said:
    Thanks both of you for your input!



    So what's my next step in identifying this? Do i wait for it to flower?
    Leaves to me appear to be alternate...therefore it would be Cornus alternifolia argentea.
    If @silv@"Silver surfer" says so. I concur.  ;)
    Devon.
  • LatimerLatimer Posts: 1,059
    Thanks @Hostafan1 & @Silver surfer for all your help. Both of you are far more knowledgeable than me so I'll go with what you say!! 😀


    I’ve no idea what I’m doing. 
  • LatimerLatimer Posts: 1,059


    Hey guys again!

    So now i need to decide where to plant the tree now we know what it is! Originally i had planned to plant it in the sloped area but felt with the number of trees in that corner already (the eucalyptus in my garden and others in the area behind the fence) i felt there was already enough height over there.

    Then i thought i would move it to the area marked "shrubs and perennials" but now I'm concerned that because of the potential height it'll throw shade across the garden. I wonder whether i shouldn't plant this at all and look at getting a smaller specimen to go in the "shrubs and perennials" area. 

    Thoughts?
    I’ve no idea what I’m doing. 
  • Butterfly66Butterfly66 Posts: 954
    Cornus alternifolia agentea has a mature height and spread of 1.5 - 2.5m (source RHS) so I doubt it’s going to get much taller than it already is (or a much denser canopy) so I wouldn’t have thought that it’s going to cast too much shade and it’s such a lovely tree.
     If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.”—Marcus Tullius Cicero
    East facing, top of a hill clay-loam, cultivated for centuries (7 years by me). Birmingham
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