Forum home Plants

Covering Clematis base and roots?

2

Posts

  • WillDBWillDB Posts: 2,496
    Fairygirl said:
    Yes - if they're from Taylor's they'll be fine. It was hard to see from the photos  :)

    Why do you put slabs over the clematis @WillDB:o
    I put broken slabs over the roots to keep the soil cool and moist underneath. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 31,069
    I don't know where this idea of putting slabs/paving/rocks etc over clematis came from. As already said by others - it's a total myth, and it's the last thing clems need if there are lots of slugs. Perfect hiding place. 
    It could also block any new stems getting through, especially on younger, immature plants, possibly preventing them getting to full potential.
    Clems [or at least the bigger ones which require a lot of moisture ] need good watering regimes,  to encourage their roots down, and help them access enough themselves, especially in dry spells. Thorough watering, and a mulch of compost/manure  or similar, is what's required, especially if the soil is a bit lighter. 

    Bearing in mind that any kind of 'stone' will actually get warm in sunny weather, and retain heat, it actually defeats the purpose, and possibly makes the ground warmer  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • StevedaylillyStevedaylilly Posts: 1,073
    Again these myths 
    Even Gardeners World Com suggest placing a roof tile over the base of a Clematis for  shaded. So is it a myth or genuine good practice 
  • MarlorenaMarlorena East AngliaPosts: 3,619
    ...I use compost around the base formed into a 'berm', like a mound up the lower stems about 4 or 5 inches which will subside and settle over time... it protects the emerging shoots from slugs I have found, and encourages rapid growth..
    ..nothing else..

    ''like nearly all climbing plants which we grow, all clematises in nature hoist themselves up through shrubs and into trees, while their roots are perforce in shade, this should be borne in mind when planting, though every now and again a plant will be seen thriving in hot sunshine..''
    G.S. Thomas.. one of the greatest plantsmen we've had in this country..

    To assert that a well established practice is a myth, one should provide some degree of evidence... 
    I don't always provide shade myself though but I get better results when I do..
  • BijdezeeBijdezee BPosts: 1,139
    I grow other plants in front and to the sides as a natural shading. Delphiniums or Larkspur look really nice with clematis. 
  • StevedaylillyStevedaylilly Posts: 1,073
    Marlorena said:
    ...I use compost around the base formed into a 'berm', like a mound up the lower stems about 4 or 5 inches which will subside and settle over time... it protects the emerging shoots from slugs I have found, and encourages rapid growth..
    ..nothing else..

    ''like nearly all climbing plants which we grow, all clematises in nature hoist themselves up through shrubs and into trees, while their roots are perforce in shade, this should be borne in mind when planting, though every now and again a plant will be seen thriving in hot sunshine..''
    G.S. Thomas.. one of the greatest plantsmen we've had in this country..

    To assert that a well established practice is a myth, one should provide some degree of evidence... 
    I don't always provide shade myself though but I get better results when I do..
    Hi Marlorena

    Exactly, 
    I have always attempted to plant my Clematis in some shade and to great success
    Obviously, to me this can be provided by other plants or by man made such as a slate tile. 
    I just wish some would stop saying they are myths when well respected sources are stating the opposite 

  • micearguersmicearguers CambridgePosts: 366
    I use @Bijdezee's approach as well ... with some geraniums, forget-me-nots and glechoma in the vicinity for example. It seems a more fluid approach.
  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen SpainPosts: 3,414
    I was interested in this, as a clematis newbie. I have one in it’s second year in the ground whose roots are in the shade. I mulch with a dark volcanic gravel (as I do with dahlias) in a circle around it, leaving a clear well of about 20cm diameter at the roots. It stops the snails in their tracks, the texture of it is a killer to them. But the gravel is also in the shade. For the one I have just planted in the sun, I just heavily mulched with compost instead as the stones would bake in the sun.

    @Stevedaylilly, I thought this explained the myth well:

    http://www.howellsonclematis.co.uk/Pages/Myths.html
  • MarlorenaMarlorena East AngliaPosts: 3,619
    ..easy to claim it's a myth if the gardener is prepared to go to some extra lengths, to keep the plants happy... if they are planted with shady roots, which is usually moist, it requires less input from the gardener, is more environmentally friendly as a result, and usually produces a better result... the so called ''right place''..
    ...to regard it as a myth, means extra artificial irrigation, certainly where I live..

    ...try it in full sun, without watering, and see how you get on... 
  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen SpainPosts: 3,414
    Perhaps it is better to consider it a misunderstanding, rather than a myth, no the roots don’t need shade, according to the above link, but it helps to conserve what they really need if they are in it - water, and lots of it, so I don’t disagree with you there Marlorena. I can certainly attest to that here, the plants at the front of the border need much more water than those shaded by those at the front. Hopefully my thick mulch will do the job until the newly planted perennials nearby provide actual shade for the clematis too!

Sign In or Register to comment.