Forum home Plants

Thilactrum hewitts double

Last year at the Manchester Tatton Park flower show I bought the most beautiful thilactrum. It had wonderful purple flowers and was a real garden highlight through late summer, even went it went to seed!

So a few weeks ago I saw buds forming and assumed it was coming back. But my dad told me it was a weed, and when I checked on the ‘picture this’ app, it labelled this plant as hairy bittercress. He was right! (1st picture)

I removed the weed from my pot, and noticed that there had been a single green shoot coming from the root stock of the thilactrum, but it I had damaged it when removing the weeds. (Second picture)

Does that mean my thilactrum won’t come back now?

If not, is it too late to plant the roots (or tubers?) in the ground? Could it be divided? Or should I leave it in its terracotta pot?

Any advice or tips would be greatly appreciated. I saw a special on Gardner’s World about this flower and yet I can find very little online about it!



«1

Posts

  • PosyPosy Posts: 3,601
    I find it difficult to get thalictrum through the winter, but you shouldn't give up yet if you had a shoot. Just wait and hope, don't move it or cause any extra stress. I'll keep my fingers crossed for you! Welcome to the forum, too.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,782
    They aren't pot specimens I'm afraid. It really needs to be in the ground.
    I'd get it in the ground as soon as you can. Then cross your fingers. It may produce more shoots. Make sure you plant it at the same level as it was in the pot too.
    They like damper ground so it may well have suffered from being too dry at an important stage. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,287
    I grow them in Essex and find them easy. But they do like damp ground as Fg says above.
    I've got about 6-8 here and there.
    A couple have already broken cover and leaves have appeared the rest are having a lie-in

    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Thank you for all your help! It was in the pot which had become somewhat buried in ivy... so I think I will keep it moist and see if some more shoots appear...

    I will post a picture if they do!
  • PosyPosy Posts: 3,601
    It's really interesting that you can grow them well in Essex, Pete 8. They like my heavy clay in summer but I think waterlogging does for them in winter.
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,287
    Lots of clay here too Posy, but I've been digging in compost on-and-off for most of the 30+ years I've been here. All of mine are in shady positions and the one that performs best is by a huge rhododendron and gets no direct sunlight at all until it gets to about 6ft.
    Such beautiful plants

    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Posts: 12,380
    Mine usually do okay in my south facing, clay soil border although I do have to keep them well watered in hot weather. I agree with you Pete, they are beautiful flowers.
    North East Somerset - Clay soil over limestone
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,782
    I garden  on clay too @Posy, but any I've had have had a slightly raised position, with plenty of 'stuff' mixed into the soil. Having other planting next to them helps suck up the excess water - of which we get plenty all year round, not just in winter  ;)
    Like many double flowered plants, the double Thalictrums  can be a wee bit fussier too. 
    Position is often key for these plants.  
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • PosyPosy Posts: 3,601
    Hmm. Mine get quite a lot of sun. Do you think shade would be better? I do all I can with wet but the water table is high!
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 5,685
    I think they can be a bit late into leaf. Mine aren't showing yet either. I accidentally dug up a thalictrum root last spring, because there was no sign of growth. (It was left bare on top of the soil for several weeks and then barely buried. In autumn I noticed it was coming back into life. They're tough!) I have had them long term in pots as well.
    "What is hateful to you, do not do to your neighbour". 
Sign In or Register to comment.