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Raspberry canes not flowering

Hi there

I'm new to this whole gardening thing and have joined the forum to get some advise form more experienced gardeners. I've bought raspberry canes and planted them in a big deep pot a few weeks ago. There was 5 of them and planted 3 in one of the pots and 2 in the other. When can I expect to see flowering? Cause I've not seen any yet at all.

Thanks 
Nathan 
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Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 30,021
    It's early days yet and it's been cold.  Patience.   None of ours is in flower yet either and we are warmer than the UK by a week or two at this time of year.
    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 3,530
    Welcome to the Forum, Nathan.  I live in one of the mildest parts of the UK, and my raspberries are only recently growing leaves, never mind flowers.  There are summer-fruiting and autumn-fruiting raspberries; do you know which yours are?  You may have many months to wait.  And don't expect a bumper crop in this, their first year.  The plants will be putting a lot of resources into root growth.  Gardening is a marathon, not a sprint!
  • nbell744nbell744 Posts: 14
    Thanks folks for the replys. It's only been a few weeks from planting and I'm not really sure what to expect, there is also a tayberry cane in one of the pots to. I'm also worried that there in pots and maybe wont be enough space. Here's a few photos of the pots and there contests. If use have any ideas or tips for me it would be greatly appreciated.


    Thanks
    Nathan
  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 17,590
    Raspberry  Malling Jewel will produce new canes this year that will produce flowers and fruit next year.  The new canes will come from below ground. You can cut those stubs down low, once your new canes start coming up.
  • ButtercupdaysButtercupdays Posts: 4,540
    You will need to find a new home for your Tayberry and soon - they are very yigourous plants. Mine regularly puts out 12 ft canes and though you can shorten them a bit, they still need plenty of space!
    The raspberries won't stand a chance.
  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 30,021
    Raspberries and tayberries do better in the ground if you can manage it.  Strawberries are fine in pots and troughs and window boxes as long as they get the food and water they need.  I wouldn't try them in shared pots.
    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • SkandiSkandi Posts: 1,723
    A little warning on the strawberries as I see they have flowers, when the flowers are open if there is a frost forecast cover the flowers, if they get frost on an open flower it kills the flower so you won't get any fruit. (the plants themselves will be dine)
  • nbell744nbell744 Posts: 14
    Thanks for the reply folks, i will take your advise and out the raspberry and tayberry in the ground. im not to sure how to go about it, do i need to just go ahead and put them in my lawn or do i need to prepare soil patch for my canes? If used could give me some advise i would be very greatful.

    Thanks
    Nathan

  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 30,021
    edited April 2020
    First of all select a good spot with plenty of sun then dig a decent planting hole and, if you can, have some soil conditioner such as well-rotted manure or garden compost to enrich the soil or maybe just some spent compost and pelleted chicken manure or blood, fish and bone if you have it.

    Water your pots well before you lift out the tayberry with as much root ball as possible and plant it at the same depth as before.  Backfill the hole and firm in gently then water well and keep it watered during dry spells especially while it's establishing again.   It will need supports so you can fan out its stems to get maximum fruiting.  Have a read of this - https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/131374/Rubus-Tayberry-Group-(F)/Details

    Raspberries also need good soil and are usually planted in rows with supports.   They will sucker and spread as the old canes are cut down at the end of their fruiting season and replaced by new ones coming up from below.   You might want to try making a raised bed or putting in something to control their spread.  If you can't do that, use the tayberry container to split them up and give them more room.
    https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=148 
    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • nbell744nbell744 Posts: 14
    Obelixx said:
    First of all select a good spot with plenty of sun then dig a decent planting hole and, if you can, have some soil conditioner such as well-rotted manure or garden compost to enrich the soil or maybe just some spent compost and pelleted chicken manure or blood, fish and bone if you have it.

    Water your pots well before you lift out the tayberry with as much root ball as possible and plant it at the same depth as before.  Backfill the hole and firm in gently then water well and keep it watered during dry spells especially while it's establishing again.   It will need supports so you can fan out its stems to get maximum fruiting.  Have a read of this - https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/131374/Rubus-Tayberry-Group-(F)/Details

    Raspberries also need good soil and are usually planted in rows with supports.   They will sucker and spread as the old canes are cut down at the end of their fruiting season and replaced by new ones coming up from below.   You might want to try making a raised bed or putting in something to control their spread.  If you can't do that, use the tayberry container to split them up and give them more room.
    https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=148 


    This is what I've done, went and got a few bags of compost and I had chicken  manure, when I was digging out the bed there was a mix of sand, stone and a gravel like substance underneath the grass. Will this hinder growth?

    Thanks
    Nathan
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