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Wilted Crassula argentea/Ovata

Hi there.  I have loved and cared for these plants for years.  However one of them has very suddenly developed very soft, limp leaves.  I don't know why.  I don't believe I have over or under watered it.  Can any of you wise people help me with this - the soil does not seem to be overly dry or at all soggy.  I am at a loss.  Lindy

Posts

  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 7,490
    You can't really under water them so it's either too much water or cold has got to them. They don't need much water at all in winter. How is the main stem looking?
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  • lindy18lindy18 Posts: 12
    Hi there, thanks for replying.  The main stem seems absolutely fine.  I suspect I have over watered it.  What do I do now?  Lindy
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 7,490
    Put it in the brightest spot you can and let it dry out, full sun would be ideal if you can find any. Remove any material that looks like it might be rotting as soon as it appears. Hopefully it will just shed any dead material and regrow it. It should be coming out of winter dormancy soon anyway so that might help it recover more quickly. Make sure to give it a feed with a specialist fertiliser when it starts to regrow so you get strong growth. I've found that helps with any problems that crop up.
    A great library has something in it to offend everybody.
  • lindy18lindy18 Posts: 12
    Many, many thanks.  I will keep you posted.
    Lindy
  • madpenguinmadpenguin Isle of WightPosts: 2,422
    Crassula are actually summer dormant plants.Many of mine have been flowering over the winter.
    I would cut off any soft pieces and let the wound dry off.
    Keep as dry as possible.
    I only water when the leaves start to wrinkle!
    “Every day is ordinary, until it isn't.” - Bernard Cornwell-Death of Kings
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 7,490
    They go dormant in very hot weather but the winter dormancy is what triggers flowering. They need cool (not cold) conditions with reduced light hours and dry soil for flowering to happen.
    A great library has something in it to offend everybody.
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