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Cuttings

FlyDragonFlyDragon Posts: 834
edited March 2020 in Plants
Hi there,

Late last summer I took cuttings from a hypericum and 2 have thrived, the problem is I don’t know what to do with them now!  

One has just just one shoot that keeps getting longer and longer and is now well over a foot long.  The other has two shoots about 6-8 inches and growing rapidly in opposite directions!

I’m about to put them in bigger pots, what can I do to encourage the right shape?

Thanks for any advice! 
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Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 30,000
    I suggest you pinch out the ends of the one with two shorter stems because that will encourage them to bush out with side shoots.

    The one with one long stem could be cut back by half and the same should happen but you may have enough for a new cutting as you seem to have the knack.
    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,716
    I'd do the same as @Obelixx suggests, as that will encourage bushiness, which is what you want for eventual planting out.  :)
    It's good to have that problem though - rather than them not taking  ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • FlyDragonFlyDragon Posts: 834
    Hexagon said:
    How and when did you take your cuttings? I'd quite like to try and multiply my own and it's good to read someone else's success story.

    Hi Hexagon, I’m no expert and this was based on advice online! 

    I took the cuttings at the at the end of the summer while the shrub was still flowering.  I didn’t actually ‘cut’ but snapped off shoots with a ‘heel’ with a decent surface area for roots to grow from.  I ran the cuttings under the tap, then dipped them into rooting powder and planted in compost for cuttings.  I wet the compost thoroughly with a fine mist spray and put a clear plastic bag over each one secured with tape round the pot. 

    Then I left them on the kitchen windowsill and hoped for the best!  I took 4 cuttings, 2 did nothing, 2 did well. 
  • FlyDragonFlyDragon Posts: 834
    Obelixx said:
    I suggest you pinch out the ends of the one with two shorter stems because that will encourage them to bush out with side shoots.

    The one with one long stem could be cut back by half and the same should happen but you may have enough for a new cutting as you seem to have the knack.
    Thanks, and sorry to ask a silly question but what do you mean by pinch out?  I’m quite new to this! 
  • FlyDragonFlyDragon Posts: 834
    Fairygirl said:
    I'd do the same as @Obelixx suggests, as that will encourage bushiness, which is what you want for eventual planting out.  :)
    It's good to have that problem though - rather than them not taking  ;)
    Haha!  I can’t believe my luck!  I’m trying the Azalea next! 
  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 30,000
    If the stems are soft, use your thumb nail and index finger to pinch them and snap off the ends.  You can also use a very sharp pair of scissors or secateurs to make sure you get a clean edge if the stem is starting to be a bit woody.
    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,716
    Azaleas will often root at ground level if you peg shoots down. You can gently scrape a little bark at the point of contact with the ground, and that helps with rooting. Once new growth appears on the pegged down shoot, you can sever it from the parent, like doing strawberry runners.

    Usually easier than cuttings, and less effort.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • FlyDragonFlyDragon Posts: 834
    Obelixx said:
    If the stems are soft, use your thumb nail and index finger to pinch them and snap off the ends.  You can also use a very sharp pair of scissors or secateurs to make sure you get a clean edge if the stem is starting to be a bit woody.
    Thank you, yes they are soft, would you advise doing that before or after repotting?
  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 30,000
    Sooner done, sooner it'll work.
    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • FlyDragonFlyDragon Posts: 834
    Well, they’ve been pinched and propped up and popped in the sunshine for a bit!

    Fingers crossed!
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