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Rose Leave Spots

Dear all

Last year I purchased and planted a David Austin climbing rose. It’s in a large container, and, while it never flowered, it did grow rather vigorously and looked very healthy for the entirety of the previous year. Unfortunately the leaves have now started looking rather unhealthy and I’m not quite sure what these spots mean. Is it a disease? It it underfed? Or could it be something else? I did spray it with a Rose Clear a few weeks ago just in case but I’m sure the effects don’t kink in straight away.

Thank you very much!

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  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen Spain.Posts: 5,621
    Hello and welcome to the forum, lots of rose fanatics on here so I’m sure we can figure it out for you...

    When you sprayed with roseclear, did you do that when it was sunny or was it sunny shortly afterwards? It looks like the leaves have been burnt by the spray/sun or something else like weedkiller to me, but I am no expert.

    What size of pot did you use and what type of compost? Roses, especially climbing roses, need very large, deep pots and a really good soil/loam-based compost, plus regular feeding in spring, summer and late summer/early autumn. If you, for example, planted it in just a multi-purpose compost, that has limited nutrients, that last a short time, and so it might do ok the first year, but will then struggle. Still, it’s surprising you didn’t get any blooms at all...

    Can you also tell us which variety of rose it is? Some, more compact varieties can be grown in pots but most climbers are vigorous and can’t survive and thrive long-term in a pot.

    I am tagging our rose expert @Marlorena who I am sure will be able to confirm or deny my initial theory!


  • MarlorenaMarlorena East AngliaPosts: 6,343
    Yes agree with Nollie... that pink and yellow mottling indicates spray damage... just pick off the leaves and let it recover..
    ...I don't spray but if I did I wouldn't do so until mid April at the earliest.. it's too cold for black spot fungus to be active...
  • Thank you very much for all your answers. It’s Etoile de Holande climbing rose. I don’t as such remember there being a sunny spell after I sprayed the plant, but maybe I picked up the only sunny day in the last couple of week to do it. But I’ll definitely be more careful next time! I’ll pick off the leaves as you said. Also, to answer your question about the pot, it’s about 45x60cm.

    Thanks again!
  • Mr. Vine EyeMr. Vine Eye Posts: 2,058
    Etoile de Hollande is a massive climber! 20ft (6m) according to the David Austin website (it’s not a DA rose by the way - it’s a climbing hybrid tea, Verschuren, 1879)

    Much too large to last more than a couple of years in a pot. It’s a - covering an entire side of a house - type rose
  • owd potterowd potter Posts: 698
    Nollie said:
    ...most climbers are vigorous and can’t survive and thrive long-term in a pot.

    I am tagging our rose expert @Marlorena who I am sure will be able to confirm or deny my initial theory!


    Oh b****r, this doesn't sound like good news for me,
    I have, or did have, my heart set on adding a climber to cover an east facing wall on my terrace (wall facing camera on below pic). Wall is 3m high x 2.50m wide and being on terrace would need to be grown in a pot, of whatever size required to make the rose sustainable.
    I was hoping for a medium, climber such as Woolerton Old Hall (good colour for our brickwork) which would hopefully eventually fill the space.
    Am I stretching too far hoping for this?
    Perhaps you or @Marlorena could suggest whether this is something achievable.

    Just another day at the plant...
  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen Spain.Posts: 5,621
    Oh dear, yes I am sure everyone will agree with Mr Vine Eyes, your rose, Etoile de Hollande, will grow far too large and vigorous for a pot. It needs to be in the ground and given a lot of space, height and sturdy wires to grow on.

    Your pot would better suit a compact shrub rose, not a climber. Or if you really want a climber, look for the smallest one possible or a shrub rose that says ‘can be trained as a short climber’ which even then usually means 2-3m, so you would need a taller trellis. 
  • MarlorenaMarlorena East AngliaPosts: 6,343
    @owd potter 
    Have no fear, you could do something with that... it's not too large a wall and I suggest a trough type planter might suit... one like mine below or larger if you can fit it in..
    ...this is my 2nd rose I've had in this pot, the first one for 5 years and it only needed topping up...  and I wouldn't be afraid to grow Wollerton in it...

     
  • LiriodendronLiriodendron Scariff, County Clare, IrelandPosts: 7,430
    Excuse me butting in... the bungalow we've moved to in Ireland has concrete paths all round it, so I'd also love to grow a climbing rose in a container to improve the appearance of the bare walls.  How big is your trough, please, @Marlorena?
    "The one who plants trees, knowing that he will never sit in their shade, has at least started to understand the meaning of life."  Rabindranath Tagore
  • MarlorenaMarlorena East AngliaPosts: 6,343
    @Liriodendron

    ....measurements here... it's not that huge.. it's made of metal and grey colour, so I painted it white.. the site is west facing and does not get the fullest sun...I water every day in hot weather, less so when cooler... at this time of year about once a week.. but it's important never to let it dry out, so good moisture retentive potting soil is required..



    I had 'Benjamin Britten' in it for 5 years...

  • LiriodendronLiriodendron Scariff, County Clare, IrelandPosts: 7,430
    Thanks very much, Marlorena.  I have a redundant plastic water tank removed by the builders... not pretty but I could make it a wooden "outer" from one of the discarded pallets, maybe, and paint it.  It's a similar volume to your trough.   :)
    "The one who plants trees, knowing that he will never sit in their shade, has at least started to understand the meaning of life."  Rabindranath Tagore
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