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Winter Jasmine - leaves dropped from the heart of it - what to do?

For the last four years this winter jasmine has been dense with foliage, so that the birdbox in the heart of it could almost not be seen.   It was still in good health as we entered autumn 2019, but now the heart has dropped its leaves, and many of the green leaves in the perimeter have dropped too - possibly because of the two recent storms here in Shropshire.

It is west facing, it gets lots of light and moderate direct sun, and it gets enough rain water. 

What should I do?

I'm wondering whether I should trim it back, removing all the green foliage around the perimeter, so that, hopefully, the centre will sprout, and I'm thinking that that if this is the best course of action then I should do it fairly soon.


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Posts

  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 3,706
    Should be grown in soil, not in a planter.
    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
  • Papi Jo, there is soil in the planter.

    Any helpful advice?
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,135
    He means grown in the soil. Not in a container.
    Plants of any kind in containers need a lot of help to thrive. They're totally reliant on you for their needs, and will run out of oomph eventually if they don't get that. There's only so long they can manage to survive as the rootball grows bigger. It's why some climbers just don't work in containers at all. 

    Has it ever had the soil refreshed/replaced?
    Do you water and feed?
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 3,706
    edited March 2020
    @Skylark001
    Of course, but not enough soil for that plant to grow happily.
    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
  • @Papi Jo, see the original post: it has flourished in that enormous planter (2 foot high) for four years.  There have been extraordinary gales here in Shropshire this last winter. 
  • @Fairygirl, yes, I have fed it each spring, even though the compost used was of high quality.  I think I'll trim it back really hard, and see if it revives this spring.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,135
    Doesn't matter how good the compost is, it isn't sufficient for long term planting. In a container, the medium needs to be mainly soil, and needs replenishing regularly. 
    There simply isn't enough nutrition, or room, for a plant of that type to get fully grown, and be sustained, in a container that size. Fine for a year or two, but after that, the plant will suffer. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 3,706
    Totally agree with @Fairygirl here. The roots must be cramped in that planter.
    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 82,254
    edited March 2020
    I agree ... that plant needs a much bigger container. 

    Is it just me who thinks that looks more like a summer jasmine than a winter one aka Jasminium nudiflorum?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/plants/plant_finder/plant_pages/430.shtml
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,135
    Yes - I'd agree @Dovefromabove. I hadn't really cottoned to the 'winter' in the title.

    They wouldn't have that amount of foliage at this time of year, not here anyway, but even so, now that you say it- the foliage isn't right for the winter one.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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