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Yew, Eucalyptus, Viburnum, Amelanchier

pitter-patterpitter-patter Posts: 2,062
edited March 2020 in Plants
My new garden has an young eucalyptus tree Silver Tropfen planted less then 30cm away from the shed. I can’t find much information about this particular variety and I wonder if they grow into very large trees.

 About a metre away there’s a viburnum Charles Lamont which, from what I hear, can’t be kept to a small size successfully.

 Just next to it there’s a young Amelanchier lamarckii which I would like to keep, but I’ve just read that it can grow up to 12 high and 8m wide. That’s about the width of the garden! Can it be kept to a size of about 3m high?

 There is also a large yew that I’m trying to reduce in size, but I’m afraid I will end up with a lollipop shape or similar...

 Which of these could I keep to a reasonable size? Any advice about them would be appreciated.







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  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,873
    The eucalyptus looks like a blue gum - here's a 25 yr old one -
    It was the same size as your when I planted it

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,160
    You can hack eucalyptus back each year to enjoy the young foliage, but to be honest, it might be better just to remove it.
    Amelanchier is technically a shrub, so you can prune it and have it as a multi stemmed specimen, but they have very light, airy canopies, and they make lovely small trees. They're very easy to keep pruned smaller anyway, so I would be inclined to keep that.
    Yew can be cut right back too - it's often used as topiary, so it will depend on how much time, and inclination,  you have to do that.
    Most viburnums become large shrubs, but again, a bit of judicious pruning will keep it in check.
    It really depends how much room each specimen has, and whether you like them enough to maintain them  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • pitter-patterpitter-patter Posts: 2,062
    edited March 2020
    Thanks, @Pete.8 . That’s what I was afraid of. 
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 82,278
    edited March 2020
    I would coppice the eucalyptus so that you always have the beautiful young foliage. 
    I have a Viburnum Bodnantense ‘Charles Lamont’ planted under a couple of meters from my sitting room window. It’s about 8 years since I planted it, is just over 6’ tall and as it had quite upright growth it only occupies a space about a meter square. It’s been full of scented blooms all winter. It’s also regularly been full of blue tits, long tailed tits, robins, dunnocks and a jenny wren ... I watch them from my seat here in the afternoons as they search the rough bark for little creatures ... I had one in a similar situation in a previous house and I’m so happy that I’ve been able to recreate it. I wouldn’t be without it. 

    If it starts to get too dense I will cut out some of the oldest stems at the base.  If doesn’t get huge and I’d be without many plants before I got rid of that one. 

    I also have a multi stemmed Amelanchier which is just about to burst into blossom ... I love it. Is yours single or multi stemmed?

    Yew can be clipped to whatever size and shape you like ... even a topiary shape like a ball or something more fancy. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • pitter-patterpitter-patter Posts: 2,062
    Thank you, @Fairygirl. I would like to keep the yew, since it’s already quite mature and gives cover for birds. I wanted to buy an Amelanchier, but I would have chosen a fastigiate one. I might try transplant it to a different place. Is now a good time? It’s still a very young tree.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,160
    If you haven't got any severe weather forecast, I'd move it.
    They're very tough and will cope well without much attention. If necessary, you can prune it back a bit too.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • FireFire North LondonPosts: 17,116
    Can I ask how fast the amelanchier Lamarkii grows? I put one in last year and it's about three ft tall. I'm regretting getting one so small.
  • pitter-patterpitter-patter Posts: 2,062
    Thank you, Dove. I knew about your viburnum and amelanchier (it was indeed your praise of the latter that made me want one in the first place). Mine is multi-stemmed as well. I might try to move the viburnum to a different spot. Is a west facing position good for it? I might even try to recreate your setting and planted it in front of the sitting room window where I’m planning to have a window seat. When is the best time to move it? 
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 82,278
    West-facing is fine ... thats where mine is. 😊 
    If the soil is nice and damp I’d move the Vib. now ... as long as you prepare the spot well, dig it up with a nice large rootball and tread it in well it’ll hardly notice it’s been moved. 😊 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,160
    I've always found them quite slow growing @Fire
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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