Forum home Plants

Plant ID please.

GraysGrays Posts: 120
Hi everyone,
Could anyone help with identifying this plant that we have had in a pot for maybe 3 or 4 years now? For some reason it struggles to flower, hopefully this year the pink flowers that are slowly appearing will cover it.
There is also some leaf damage, that I have tried to show in one of the photos, any idea what is causing this?

Many thanks.
«1

Posts

  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 31,600
    looks like a dwarf rhododendron with leaf cutter bee damage
    Devon.
  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 3,449
    Agree with @philippa smith2 rhodos are not meant to live in pots. :(
    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
  • GraysGrays Posts: 120
    Thanks for the replies, I will have to try find a place for it somewhere in the garden.

    Regarding the leaves, any idea how to improve or stop what is happening to it?
  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 11,249
    If you are planting it out, they need acidic soil and partial shade.
    He calls her the chocolate girl
    Cause he thinks she melts when he touches her
    She knows she's the chocolate girl
    Cause she's broken up and swallowed
    And wrapped in bits of silver
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,336
    The holes on the edges of the leaves could have been caused by adult vine weevils.  Those lay their eggs in the soil and then hatch into white C-shaped grubs which eat the roots.  Because vw much prefer laying their eggs in pots rather than the soil (where there are natural predators), planting it out will probably alleviate the issue, especially if you wash all of the old potting compost from the roots just before you plant it.  As pd says, they do need acidic soil though, so if yours is alkaline, you would be better off repotting it into a larger pot using ericaceous compost (but still wash the old stuff off with cold water as a precaution against possible vw eggs/grubs.)
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • GraysGrays Posts: 120
    The holes on the edges of the leaves could have been caused by adult vine weevils.  Those lay their eggs in the soil and then hatch into white C-shaped grubs which eat the roots.  Because vw much prefer laying their eggs in pots rather than the soil (where there are natural predators), planting it out will probably alleviate the issue, especially if you wash all of the old potting compost from the roots just before you plant it.  As pd says, they do need acidic soil though, so if yours is alkaline, you would be better off repotting it into a larger pot using ericaceous compost (but still wash the old stuff off with cold water as a precaution against possible vw eggs/grubs.)
    Thank you Bob.
    Excuse my ignorance, I am still a novice at gardening, but I am taking a keen interest lately...... but how do I find out what kind of soil I have in the garden?

    Thanks again.
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,336
    Have a look at the soilscapes website which will tell you what your general area is like by zooming in to your location.  Click 'Legend' on the right and it'll show what the colours mean:

    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • GraysGrays Posts: 120
    Thanks Bob,
    This is what the site said about the soil in my area -Slowly permeable seasonally wet slightly acid but base-rich loamy and clayey soils.

    So, "slightly acidic" - would this be suitable to plant it out in the garden?
    Struggling to find a place at the moment, so may go buy a bigger pot tomorrow and the compost type you mention, is that a "common" type of compost btw? I have some in the garage so will check to see if it is suitable.

    Thanks again.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,171
    Neutral soil is fine for rhodies. They just don't like alkaline soil.
    If you don't have room for it to planted in the ground, you can keep it in a bigger pot, but don't use compost alone, as it needs more substance. If you get a mix of soil and compost that will be fine.
    You may need to do  a bit of pruning each year or two to keep it happy. That's best done immediately after flowering, to give the shrub a chance to put on growth and prepare for the following year's flowers.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • GraysGrays Posts: 120
    Fairygirl said:
    Neutral soil is fine for rhodies. They just don't like alkaline soil.
    If you don't have room for it to planted in the ground, you can keep it in a bigger pot, but don't use compost alone, as it needs more substance. If you get a mix of soil and compost that will be fine.
    You may need to do  a bit of pruning each year or two to keep it happy. That's best done immediately after flowering, to give the shrub a chance to put on growth and prepare for the following year's flowers.
    Thanks for the advice.
Sign In or Register to comment.