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Leaf Mould

Last year I successfully made leaf mould, but what is the best use for it? Can it go on my raised veggie beds or is it more beneficial on the flower garden?

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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,932
    I don't really have veg beds, so I've always used it on beds and borders. It's most useful as a mulch to retain moisture and/or prevent excess weed growth. Also for aesthetic purposes.
    I'm not sure how beneficial it is on veg beds, but I expect someone who has them might advise.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • KeenOnGreenKeenOnGreen Posts: 1,735
    Monty always says it has little to no nutritional value, and is "only" good for improving soil texture.  We only use it where our soil is too heavy/clay, or where specific plants do better when it is incorporated around them (such as woodland plants).  I wouldn't put it on the veggie patch, some good garden compost or manure would be better there.
  • ChrinnieChrinnie Posts: 7
    Many thanks both, greatly appreciate your thoughts.
  • Allotment BoyAllotment Boy North London Posts: 5,821
    If you grow raspberries you can use it to mulch them, they don't like rich manure it gives too much green growth & less flowers & fruit. You still need to feed with high potash feed though. The other use for it is to supplement potting compost, the old gardeners used it instead of peat. It is also said to be very good for helping woody cuttings establish.
    AB Still learning

  • Interesting replies, I thought it was nutritionally good as they call it Gardeners Gold? Is it still good to incorporate shredded leaves into the compost mix then to get more nutriants?
  • JoeXJoeX Posts: 1,783
    Interesting replies, I thought it was nutritionally good as they call it Gardeners Gold? Is it still good to incorporate shredded leaves into the compost mix then to get more nutriants?
    As I understand it, it’s not rich in nitrogen but it does contain nitrogen.  It’s primary benefit is as a soil conditioner, and this is where my knowledge breaks down - I believe it is the other properties of the soil rather than purely the nitrogen content that affect fertility.  Things like how easy it is for roots to grow, that sort of thing.
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,391
    A major benefit of using leaf mould is that it is the perfect food for the soil ecosystem (after all, the microbes and fungi in the soil have naturally evolved to be 'fed' by fallen leaves.)  Healthy soil biology equals healthy plants.  Home made compost also provides similar benefits.
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
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