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Lupin seeds poll

EricsGardenEricsGarden Posts: 141
edited March 2020 in The potting shed
Last summer we harvested the seeds from a beautiful huge Lupin plant we got from a major supermarket. I've never planted Lupin seeds before and I'm quite new to gardening in general. Today we planted those seeds but due to so much differing advice about how to prepare the seeds we have done it 8 different ways. They're currently in our unheated greenhouse.

Which one do you think will be the most successful? Vote now.
I will post the results in a few weeks if any of them actually sprout.



PS: Two weeks ago I planted 3 seeds that were not prepared like these, they have not sprouted, yet.


Lupin seeds poll 1 vote

Chillded
0%
Chilled and soaked
100%
Valleysgirl 1 vote
Chilled and scraped
0%
Chilled, soaked and scraped
0%
Frozen
0%
Frozen and soaked
0%
Frozen and scraped
0%
Frozen, soaked and scraped
0%
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Posts

  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 11,364
    Sorry to be a party pooper, but you don't need to do any of that.
    Simply remove seeds from packet, sow, job done  :)
    He calls her the chocolate girl
    Cause he thinks she melts when he touches her
    She knows she's the chocolate girl
    Cause she's broken up and swallowed
    And wrapped in bits of silver
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,559
    I use the same method as punckdoc.
    Protecting the spring shoots from slugs and snails is the difficult bit :)
    Good luck - will be interesting to hear the outcome
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • AstroAstro Posts: 357
    Yes I've found they germinate easily, afterwards I've not been as successful. As pointed out slugs and snails love them. Also for me they seem vulnerable dying off before they get to any decent size even when they have a few true leaves.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,628
    Sow as @punkdoc says and then grow on the individual plants in their own pots till in 4" to 6"/10 to 15 cm pots before planting out.   Beware of slugs and snails even then.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • EricsGardenEricsGarden Posts: 141
    punkdoc said:
    Sorry to be a party pooper, but you don't need to do any of that.
    Simply remove seeds from packet, sow, job done  :)
    Pete.8 said:
    I use the same method as punckdoc.
    Protecting the spring shoots from slugs and snails is the difficult bit :)
    Good luck - will be interesting to hear the outcome
    Obelixx said:
    Sow as @punkdoc says and then grow on the individual plants in their own pots till in 4" to 6"/10 to 15 cm pots before planting out.   Beware of slugs and snails even then.
    Interesting but I tried that (I mention this in my original post), but the seeds haven't sprouted still after a couple of weeks indoors under a grow light, so this is why I started doing some research.

    Maybe none of them will sprout because for some reason the seeds aren't viable.

    I've heard of terminator seeds in the US, but there's no chance a Lupin from a UK supermarket would have been GM altered in this way right?
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,628
    Lupin seeds should be sown between March and May and take 15 to 20 days to germinate.   You have been hasty and are now being impatient.   Give them time.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,433
    I'd agree. If you just wait till conditions/temps etc are right, they will germinate without any help  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,559
    Last time I grew them (2017) I sowed seed on 3rd March (coincidentally) in my heated propagator.
    I ended up with 7 plants from 10 seed.
    I potted them on eventually into 2L pots, overwintered in a cold frame and planted them out the following spring just as they were shooting.
    They are getting too big now so will start again and hope for some more interesting colours. 
    I saw the first leaves appearing a few days ago - no slugs so far....
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • EricsGardenEricsGarden Posts: 141
    Obelixx said:
      You have been hasty and are now being impatient.   Give them time.
    That's probably fair. I now see I sowed those first 3 seeds on 13 Feb so not even 3 weeks ago. Part of my impatience could be from the fact that I planted some Teasel seeds indoors a just week ago and they now look like this (below). At the same time I planted the Teasel's I also planted Black Eyed Susans and not a single one has sprouted yet. Being new too all this I am learning that not all seeds are the same. 

    I have to ask, I should get more success planting them indoors under a grow light (albeit the cheapest I could find) than outdoors in a cold greenhouse with more direct sunlight?

    Although this is all new to me I have to say I'm really enjoying it and find it all really fascinating. Plants are just awesome aren't they 😀

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,628
    Sorry.  I've never used a grow light.  I've used heated propagators for seeds that do better with warmer compost but otherwise use natural light which often means waiting till March or April for enough natural light.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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