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What Type of Soil is This?

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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 35,520
    "If I order compost, will the manure or do I have to specify?"


    I don't understand,  sorry
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • tuacuerdatetuacuerdate Posts: 16
    edited February 2020
    Fairygirl said:
    "If I order compost, will the manure or do I have to specify?"


    I don't understand,  sorry

    Sorry, my bad.

     "If I order compost, will I get manure or do I have to specify?"
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 35,520
    Compost isn't the same as manure.
    You can either source it from a local stables/riding school/farm or similar, and it needs to be well rotted if you intend planting into it in the next few months, or you can buy it bagged in Garden Centres etc. Some places will offer bulk deliveries of manure too. 

    Fresh manure is too rich and fresh for plant roots. If the ground is going to lie for a good 6 months, fresh stuff can be laid on it, and weather and worms etc will work it in, or it can be stored in a corner  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • I used to go and ask a horse owner if I could borrow some poo. Shovel it into a couple of black bins. Store them for a few months.

    Once the poo has dried, no longer stinks and can be broken in your hand - its good to use.

    I've also added it fresh straight into unplanted flower beds, turn the ground a let it lie a few months before planting.
  • If you're anywhere near the south-downs then it looks like you have the atypical claylike structure with a lot of chalk and stones. All I can say to that is don't try to grow Camellias or acid loving plants. Maybe try to focus on irises and other more Mediterranean-esque plants. It's worth getting a PH testing kit available from most garden centers. The ph of your soil will tell you what you can grow, most plants will tolerate neutral soil, but Camellias, Azaleas and blueberries won't be happy at all.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 35,520
    He's in Perthshire @Harry Armstrong.
    It's a few miles north of the south downs.... ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • UpNorthUpNorth South Leeds, West Yorkshire, UK Posts: 374
    I am 100 percent sure you do not have sandy soil.  We have sandy and after 3 months of rain we have never had any standing water, it runs through like it would on a beach.  

    The question is probably to what extent do you have clay.  

    It's more common to have neither clay not sandy extremes.  So in all probability your soil will accommodate a wide variety of plants.
  • Songbird-1Songbird-1 Posts: 1,893
    edited February 2020
    @tuacuerdate, I’m no expert on soil types but looking at your first pictures, I would describe that soil/ground as looking pretty much like ours did when I took off a layer of what looked like fish tank gravel in our garden last year. We have recently moved here and there’s was nothing but two overgrown shrubs in the garden- the rest covered in bark or gravel. 
    Once cleared, the ground was like yours. I took it to be very clay bound. I added lots of top soil and mpc to the ground, broke it all down, hoed it to death, left it fallow for a few months and then planted up some plants we liked. The border is growing healthily and looking good. We chose plants to fit the aspect of the area ie a bit of sun but mainly shaded in summer. We did FBB round the plants in the spring too. 
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