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Meconopsis x sheldonii 'Lingholm'

mirandawmirandaw Posts: 17
Hi All,

I have just bought some little plants of Meconopsis x sheldonii 'Lingholm' and it's going to be quite a challenge because my garden is mostly south-facing,and I don't have any means to collect rain water.... I bought little plants because they are so difficult to grow from seed and I just want to try them.

They need part shade, not a lot of sun, special soil, best is to water with rainwater and so on.

If it's possible I want to keep them in containers because of my garden being south-facing mostly, so I don't really have a spot that doesn't get much sun. 

Does anyone have any experience with planting the blue Meconopsis in containers?

And what kind of soil is best?

Any help is appreciated.

Thanks, Miranda

Posts

  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 14,563
    It like acidic fertile well drained soil with plenty of organic matter.  If you use a large tub filled with ericaeous compost, that should be OK. Prop it on bricks in winter so that it doesn't get sodden.
    You don't stop doing new things because you get old, you get old because you stop doing new things. <3
  • mirandawmirandaw Posts: 17
    Hi Fidgetbones,

    And with ericaceous compost you mean compost especially for e.g. Azalea, Hydrangea and Rhododendrons?

    Thanks.
  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 14,563
    Yes. 
    You don't stop doing new things because you get old, you get old because you stop doing new things. <3
  • AndymanAndyman Posts: 20
    edited 13 February
    Hi mirandaw,
    My experience of growing 'Lingholm' may be of help to you.
    I visited Holehird Gardens in Windermere in the late summer of 2018 where they hold the national collection of Meconopsis, and was lucky to speak to their expert grower. I left there with tons of knowledge and quite a collection of fine seed taken fresh from ripe flower pods.
    I still have lots of seed in my fridge and I'm about to sow some of it in ericaceous compost.
    I did the same thing last February and ended up with a dozen strong growing plants which I left outside this winter. I sowed the seed thinly into a 3 inch square plastic pot and covered with fine grit. Then I placed it in a shallow saucer in a shady position outside and forgot about them for three months. One day I noticed several tiny shoots appearing above the grit and after another month or so they were big enough to be transferred into their own individual pots. I found that sowing Meconopsis from seed no different to sowing most other seed. It just takes a little patience, that's all.  
    Each plant grew well in a shady position against a fence panel and the only attention required was to water them from below with rainwater which I collect in a large plastic container. The compost must not be allowed to get bone dry. The leaves died down when the first frosts hit, but like all perennial plants, I'm expecting them to spring into life as the weather gets warmer and light levels improve.
    I live in North East England which isn't ideal for growing 'Lingholm' in the soil as it is too heavy and on the alkaline side. We also don't get the amount of rain as the North West which the plants require to thrive. However, I'm pleased with the results so far and this year I'm hoping to see last years plants flower for the first time.
    Good luck with growing on your little plants.
  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 8,366
    I have grown various Meconopsis, from seed, over many years.
    IMO the key is to sow the seed in winter, normal compost works fine.
    When they are large enough to plant out, give them: partial shade, an acidic leafy soil and don't let them dry out.
    Did they tear it out with talons of steel
    And give you a shot, so that you wouldn't feel?
    And washed it away as if it wasn't real?
  • mirandawmirandaw Posts: 17
    Thanks everyone for all the replies.

    Andyman, thank you for your long post with a lot of information !
    And Punkdoc, I haven't grown them from seed, I have bought some small plants.

    My plants will arrive tomorrow so I'm very excited and I will try out all your advice !

    Thanks again !
  • mirandawmirandaw Posts: 17
    My plants have arrived and although they are small, they look good.

    It's not possible in my garden to collect rainwater. Do they really need only rainwater or can they take normal water too? If they really can't take normaly water, I will have to find another solution.

    Thanks.
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