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Using cinnamon powder on seeds as a fungicide?

Hi all, I have come across a number of seed videos online that suggest sprinkling cinnamon powder on top of your seed trays after sowing, as a natural fungicide, to help prevent damping off disease.  They say it doesn't harm or impair the seeds at all.   Do you agree/disagree with this method?  Has anyone had success (or problems) trying this method?

Thanks.

Posts

  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 9,397
    I think it is totally unnecessary, if you practise good seed growing technique.
    Sow thinly
    Remove moisture from propagator lids
    Encourage air flow
    Water carefully.
    Too many hands in too many pockets
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    Before the day starts
  • Hmmm I might try a 50/50 experiment then, thanks both.
  • punkdoc said:
    I think it is totally unnecessary, if you practise good seed growing technique.
    Sow thinly
    Remove moisture from propagator lids
    Encourage air flow
    Water carefully.

    "Remove moisture from propagator lids"

    Okay, dumb question of the day (I meant to ask you this before): 

    Why remove moisture from the propagator lids?  I thought the point of the lids was to hold the moisture in, in order to humidify the environment and keep the seed trays/pots moist?

    "Encourage air flow"

    What is the correct/most efficient way to use the little open/close air vent on the top of the propagator lids?  I tend to just leave mine open to allow in a bit of fresh air, but I don't see how it allows air to flow very well?  Also, am I supposed to be shutting the little air vent at certain times?

    (Thanks.)

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 25,361
    Condensation on the lids may drip onto your teeny seedlings or cuttings and encourage rotting.

    Keep the little ventilator holes open and then the simple act of removing the lid to wipe it will give a fresh change of air for the babies.  They take in carbon dioxide and emit oxygen and, like us, need the air to be changed to reset the levels so they don't suffocate.

    If you are growing tropical jungle plants, they will probably appreciate high humidity which is best maintained with closed vents but you still have to remove the lids occasionally to refresh their air and check how they're doing.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Obelixx said:
    Condensation on the lids may drip onto your teeny seedlings or cuttings and encourage rotting.

    Keep the little ventilator holes open and then the simple act of removing the lid to wipe it will give a fresh change of air for the babies.  They take in carbon dioxide and emit oxygen and, like us, need the air to be changed to reset the levels so they don't suffocate.

    If you are growing tropical jungle plants, they will probably appreciate high humidity which is best maintained with closed vents but you still have to remove the lids occasionally to refresh their air and check how they're doing.

    Ahaaa!  It all makes sense now!  Thanks!
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