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Starbucks doing something right

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  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Bath, SomersetPosts: 6,585
    edited January 2020
    I've never walked around carrying a cup of coffee, I think it must be a generation 'thing'. I do enjoy an occasional coffee in a café whilst shopping or travelling, although OH doesn't much. I don't eat in the street either (ice cream on holiday excepted), like Hosta says, our mothers always said it was 'common'. That was a long time ago though and habits have changed.
  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 8,849
    I love my coffee, but I really don't enjoy any of the large chains offerings.
    Walk out to winter, swear I'll be there.
    Chill will wake you, high and dry
    You'll wonder why.
  • I suddenly looked back and thought:  OMG where have the last 50 years gone?  Because it was then (early 70s) that I worked in Upper St Martin's Lane in London.  Out of the tube station at Leicester Square, sharp left - stop at little coffee shop.  The chap knew his regulars.  One cup (normal size, not one of these huge buckets) and a lid on top (sans sippy thing) and I would carry it into my office, sit down at the desk and savour the moment before the start of the office day.

    So take-away coffee isn't a new thing - but the huge beakers of the stuff and the posing of importance as you carry them is.

    My (now retired) daily indulgence is a cafetiere of coffee - one cup to set me up for the day.  The thought of these SB/Costa cups leaves me cold.  And on the couple of occasions I have been into such an establishment - just how long does it have to take to serve said cup of coffee? Stand around, they nip off to Colombia to get the beans.  Roast 'em and grind 'em and eventually thrust the grounds under a huge machine that sputters steam through the coffee.  Hmmm.  Life's too short!

  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 7,337
    I don't drink coffee these days, but l remember the old Cadena cafe in Gloucester. If you asked for coffee, they picked up the pyrex jug that was sitting on a hotplate and poured it into a cup. 
    If you wanted milk and/or sugar l'm pretty sure you helped yourself. 
    All this standing around in a queue while they prepare Americano, Latte, Cappuccino etc. drives me nuts, because if there's only one whizzy machine they can only do one at a time.
     All that banging and wiping round. Still, l'm sure it's worth it in the end, although l've usually finished drinking my tea by the time my OH gets his coffee . I like the nice patterns they do on the top though - some are very intricate :)
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 26,638
    AnniD said:
    I don't drink coffee these days, but l remember the old Cadena cafe in Gloucester. If you asked for coffee, they picked up the pyrex jug that was sitting on a hotplate and poured it into a cup. 
    If you wanted milk and/or sugar l'm pretty sure you helped yourself. 
    All this standing around in a queue while they prepare Americano, Latte, Cappuccino etc. drives me nuts, because if there's only one whizzy machine they can only do one at a time.
     All that banging and wiping round. Still, l'm sure it's worth it in the end, although l've usually finished drinking my tea by the time my OH gets his coffee . I like the nice patterns they do on the top though - some are very intricate :)
    and now they do it in filling stations so you have to wait whilst their cars are parked at the pumps whilst they wait for the frothy whizzy nonsense to take place, then after you've filled up,once   you eventually get to a pump, you have to wait in a queue because the person behind the till is off doing the frothy whizzy stuff. 
    Devon.
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 5,631
    In the obituary of mankind that will be left behind for future lifeforms to find so that they know of the idiocy that led to our premature demise, the word 'Puppacino' will be in bold. :|
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 26,638
    In the obituary of mankind that will be left behind for future lifeforms to find so that they know of the idiocy that led to our premature demise, the word 'Puppacino' will be in bold. :|
    so they're not content with pumping humans full of sugar , they want to stuff their dogs full of fat?? And gullible consumers will flock to both. 
    Devon.
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 16,841
    punkdoc said:
    Being a man, I find it impossible to drink and walk at the same time, multi-tasking is not for me.
    I’m a bit like that in the mornings, I find it impossible to talk and walk at the same time. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 26,638
    Lyn said:
    punkdoc said:
    Being a man, I find it impossible to drink and walk at the same time, multi-tasking is not for me.
    I’m a bit like that in the mornings, I find it impossible to talk and walk at the same time. 
    I try to avoid talking first thing in the morning. It's not my best/ most diplomatic time of day.
    Devon.
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 5,631
    Hostafan1 said:
    In the obituary of mankind that will be left behind for future lifeforms to find so that they know of the idiocy that led to our premature demise, the word 'Puppacino' will be in bold. :|
    so they're not content with pumping humans full of sugar , they want to stuff their dogs full of fat?? And gullible consumers will flock to both. 
    People will argue that it's a harmless treat for dogs but they're probably the same people who think it's ok to feed tuna to cats.
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