Forum home Garden design

Finally my own garden

145791013

Posts

  • CrazybeeladyCrazybeelady WarwickshirePosts: 230
    Hello, just been reading your thread, the garden looks really good.  I have/had a new build garden and tried to make it look good but it's a bit crap really, I didn't have a clue when I started it and I think it shows!  Being an apprentice gardener must have helped.  Your neighbour on the right appears to have drawn the short straw in garden width!
    Question - and I'm sure many people can answer this, but when you have quite a big, deep border, how do you access the plants at the back without crushing the ones in front??  To dead head for example.  I'm going to widen my border this year, OK I could leave gaps, but the best borders do not look like they have gaps!
  • purplerallimpurplerallim LincolnshirePosts: 3,899
    I have placed a couple of half sized paving slabs in among the plants, which get covered with growth,  but allow accessibility without crushing things.😁
  • One of my "stepping stones" is 25cm long tortoise.  It was one of the things I had when we cleared my late mum's property.  (Stone, of course).
  • CrazybeeladyCrazybeelady WarwickshirePosts: 230
    edited 9 March
    I was wondering how you managed to get the tortoise to stand still @Mrs-B3-Southampton,-Hants   :D

    I'll have to try the stones plan.
  • tui34tui34 Béziers, Herault, FrancePosts: 1,167
    What an amazing transformation!  Well done!  Much hard work has gone on there - love to see it end of summer.    
    A good hoeing is worth two waterings.

  • newprojectgardennewprojectgarden Posts: 73
    edited 14 March
    Hello, just been reading your thread, the garden looks really good.  I have/had a new build garden and tried to make it look good but it's a bit crap really, I didn't have a clue when I started it and I think it shows!  Being an apprentice gardener must have helped.  Your neighbour on the right appears to have drawn the short straw in garden width!
    Question - and I'm sure many people can answer this, but when you have quite a big, deep border, how do you access the plants at the back without crushing the ones in front??  To dead head for example.  I'm going to widen my border this year, OK I could leave gaps, but the best borders do not look like they have gaps!


    Hi! Thanks for stopping back. How long have you been in your house for now? I'm sure it's not looking crap. Feel free to message me with any questions, although I'm sure you're knowledgable in the area, you are a member on gardeners world forum after all :P

    Yes they did draw the short straw! and i hope they aren't reading this :D I'm still surprised at the size of my garden for a new build (shared ownership).

    In regards to getting to the back of borders, like some people have said, stepping stones can work, or if there is enough space a narrow board to stand on. I guess sometimes it can't be avoided stepping on the soil, I just try to do it as little as possible and cultivate the area after if possible,


    What an amazing transformation!  Well done!  Much hard work has gone on there - love to see it end of summer.    

    Thank you tuikowhai, it has been a lot of hard work, looking forward to hopefully being rewarded for it in summer :)



  • newprojectgardennewprojectgarden Posts: 73
    edited 14 March

    Today I was planning on mulching the borders, however...I ended up double digging all the way up the left hand side and part of the back (levelled it off), added compost and some topsoil to the bottom of each trench and forked it in. It was hard work and took all weekend just to do the left hand side... :s

    Once I plant perennials/grasses and the palms etc it will be hard to properly dig the borders. So i thought it was worth double digging for the last time. Next weekend I'll work on the rest of the back and the right hand side of the garden...

    Then I can mulch which will make it look really nice and help improve the soil again..

    See you next week :)






  • D0rdogne_DamselD0rdogne_Damsel Saint Yrieix La Perche, Haute Vienne/Dordogne border. FrancePosts: 3,316
    Good morning @newprojectgarden,

    Congratulations on your new home/garden, so exciting for you. :)

    Do keep posting the updates and photos, it is lovely to watch other gardeners projects, and very motivating. I have found the forum full of good advice too, it is really good to hear other people's views and suggestions too. 

    Great too to see the way @madpenguin 's garden has developed, very inspiring (and beautiful). :)

    Shame the developers have made such a mess of the garden and the turf is so poor, but I am sure you will soon have it sorted. Good luck and thank you for sharing. 


    "To nurture a garden is to feed not just the body, but the soul." — Alfred Austin
  • D0rdogne_DamselD0rdogne_Damsel Saint Yrieix La Perche, Haute Vienne/Dordogne border. FrancePosts: 3,316
    The progress you have made is amazing in such a short space of time. I love it too. :)
    "To nurture a garden is to feed not just the body, but the soul." — Alfred Austin
  • didywdidyw East SuffolkPosts: 582
    Have just come across this thread.  It's been fascinating to watch the progress of your garden @newprojectgarden.  Very impressed to see what you have managed to achieve in such a short time.  
Sign In or Register to comment.