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Help with pruning climbing rose

Last year I pruned a very old and over grown climbing rose. I don’t think I took it low enough and now there is loads of growth from last year which is very long and all over place. Advice appreciated on what to do. Thank you 

Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,545
    Try and lay those long new stems as horizontally as possible or diagonally across a support.   Tie them in gently with garden twine or special plastic ties, leaving some wiggle room for growth and windy days.   They should then produce shorter shoots which will carry flowers for this season.   
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Brilliant thanks you 
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,545
    You can do the same with new shoots o that clematis.  It will produce more flowers that way too.

    A generous spring feed will help too - good dollop of well-rotted manure (bags form the DIY or GC?) or a generous handful of blood, fish and bone and an occasional liquid feed of rose or tomato feed.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Busy-LizzieBusy-Lizzie Posts: 20,369
    I think the length of those stems is more down to the variety of the rose rather than the way you pruned it. My Madame Alfred Carrière grows stems like that. As Obelixx says, training them sideways will help if you have enough room.
    Dordogne and Norfolk
  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen Spain.Posts: 6,526
    I recently discovered a really good video on how to train and prune climbing roses, the second one on this link I found clearer:

    https://www.heirloomroses.com/info/care/videos/

    My climbing roses aren’t big enough to train much yet, but I have saved the link for future use!
  • @Obelixx hi re the comment re the clematis ... good spot do I just cut down to above the new shoots. I was about to cut right back the ground so glad you saw it! Thanks Louise 

  • @Busy-Lizzie just looked at Madame Alfred Carrière and looks very similar if not the same. Thank you 
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,545
    edited January 2020
    Depends on what clematis it is.  If it's early flowering you should leave it and just ct out obvious dead stems but if it flowers after June, you can prune each stem back to the lowest buds now that it's clearly excited about spring coming.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Valley GardenerValley Gardener Rhondda ValleyPosts: 2,685
    Obelixx said:
    Try and lay those long new stems as horizontally as possible or diagonally across a support.   Tie them in gently with garden twine or special plastic ties, leaving some wiggle room for growth and windy days.   They should then produce shorter shoots which will carry flowers for this season.   

    Thanks for that @Obelixx, I was wondering what I should do with mine as a last resort.

    The whole truth is an instrument that can only be played by an expert.
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