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Is this Honey Fungus? And, could it attack container plants?

jucati1198jucati1198 Buckinghamshire Posts: 56
Just moved to a new property and found a fungus growing on an old tree stump right next to an apple tree. It does look like a honey fungus but I'm not sure. It's a temporarily rented property so I'm not worried about the garden too much but I do have loads of planters with all sorts of shrubs and perennials that I will be moving with me to a new property next year. Most of them are standing on a gravel bed near the apple tree. One potted fir was standing on the lawn, right next to the stump. Should I be worried about the potted plants? There is no plastic underneath the gravel. Can the fungus infect containers?  I have done a lot of online research but cannot find a single article about containers. Please help. 


Posts

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 21,202
    edited January 2020
    Fungi travel by two methods.

    Firstly, they have underground filaments that attach themselves to the roots of plants. Unlikely for one of these to bother to seek out the drainage hole in a pot and squeeze in there. 

    Secondly, the mushroom part releases spores which blow away in the wind and start new colonies. That would seem to be more likely.

    However, the conditions have to be just right for the spores to develop. Right amount of moisture, right type of compost/soil and right plant to parasitise. A lot to get right there.

    So, on the whole, I don’t think that you have much to worry about. But if you really want to, pick off the mushrooms and throw them in the bin.



    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • Ante1Ante1 Senj, CroatiaPosts: 2,562
    edited January 2020
    Hi @jucati1198.
    Winter isn't the time when Honey fungus grows. Only few fungi grow at winter time, and one of them is Flammulina velutipes, which is on your photo. We call her velvet trunk mushroom and in english is Enoki. Edible mushroom and it is used in pharmaceutical industry.
    Here is my. I took this photo yesterday:


  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 21,202
    Respect, Ante!⭐️⭐️⭐️🙂

    We British are so ignorant about fungi that we just assume that they are all poisonous or in some way bad.

    There you go, jucati, tonight’s dinner is organised.😊
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • Ante1Ante1 Senj, CroatiaPosts: 2,562
    Thanks Pansy.
    Never too much careful with mushrooms.
  • This is what I belive to be Honey Fungus. Found it growing around an old rotting tree stump.
    Felt the need to leave it as it looked spectacular.



  • jucati1198jucati1198 Buckinghamshire Posts: 56
    Thank you @Ante30 and @pansyface, just wanted to be on the safe side and avoid spreading it, in case it’s a baddy! 
    I have to say, it does look very similar to the photo of @Digweed51 😳

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 21,202
    Yes, but I’d say that Digweed’s mushrooms have little nipples.🙂
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • jucati1198jucati1198 Buckinghamshire Posts: 56
    Thank you! @pansyface
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