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Lemon tree

johnhughes1960johnhughes1960 Canvey islandPosts: 6
Hi, we've got a problem with our lemon tree, we have had it indoors for several weeks now, it seemed fine, but now the leaves are dropping off steadily day by day. It has several lemons on it, and new greenery is growing, but alot of the leaves have developed a yellow motally appearance on them, can you help? 
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  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,103
    The problem is called chlorosis.

    Question 1. Have you been giving it regular foliar (spray) feeds? If not, the plant may be lacking certain trace elements such as magnesium. If so,

    Question 2. Have you also been watering it regularly (with or without feed included in the water)? If so, you may have been overwatering it. Overwatering can remove trace elements from the soil. It can also rot the plant’s roots and prevent them from taking up trace elements.

    So it’s either root rot causing lack of food or lack of food caused by inadequate feeding.


    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • johnhughes1960johnhughes1960 Canvey islandPosts: 6
    Thanks for your reply, we have been watering it once every 3 to 4 weeks, is that OK? Also what would you suggest feeding it with? we haven't ever used any leaf spray on it, should we? thanks again for your help 
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,502
    The mottled appearance on the leaves is unusual for chlorosis, but I have no experience with growing lemons. It may well be a Mg deficiency as pf says and is the most likely reason, but also worth checking for spider mites.
    They're invisible to the naked eye and almost transparent, but can be seen easily with a magnifying glass on the underside of leaves if they're present.
    Sometimes you'll find tiny webs on the plant too.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,103
    There are special citrus foliar feeds that you can buy in any garden centre. 

    It doesn’t sound as if you are over watering it.

    Yes, spider mites are a possibility.
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • johnhughes1960johnhughes1960 Canvey islandPosts: 6
    Had a look and I think it may be spider mite there are little black things under some of the leave, and some small webs will try this first and let you know how I get on, thanks 
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,103
    Yup, spider mite it is.😁
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,502
    They can be quite tricky to deal with especially on a plant that grows edibles.
    I've read good reports of a product called SB Invigorator but have never had cause to use it myself.
    General bug killers don't work, so best to make sure whatever you treat it with is for spider mite.
    It's probably the 2-spot spider mite
    https://www.google.com/search?q=2-spot+spider+mite&sxsrf=ACYBGNRqxWV0RPS4LWVMAkFRA78ZzflYjQ:1578846697016&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiO856kvv7mAhXQYMAKHc6yC9AQ_AUoAXoECA8QAw&biw=1920&bih=1057

    Spider mites do not like cool temperatures nor do they like humidity.
    It's the warmth and dryness of being indoors that's let them thrive
    good luck!
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • johnhughes1960johnhughes1960 Canvey islandPosts: 6
    Thanks 
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,103
    You could always bung it outside in the wind and the rain for a day. Make sure that the temperature is above about 8°C and bring it in if it drops below that. 

    The spider mites might decide to decamp if they find that conditions are not pleasant.😊
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • Keep an eye open for scale insect as well. They just love citrus plants. You can identify them by looking closely at the stems. The insects do not very move much, they look like miniscule limpits stuck to the surface of the stems. You have to scrape them with your nail to squish them.  If I find any I wipe all of the branches with neat alcohol, vodka, gin etc. seems a waste but it works. Use cotton wool and push down into where the leaves and stems join as that is where the blighters hide., white spirit or methylated spirit also work. Very dry conditions cause an infestation.
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