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Pet friendly weedkiller

The paving slabs in the patio were laid with almost one inch wide gaps between. The cement infill was recessed below the level of the slabs. Over the years has become covered by various types of organic detritus which has been colonised by weeds.  Long term solution is to rake out and replace the cement but until I can get round to it I would like to kill the weeds.  Having a dog what is a suitable weedkiller?  
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  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 8,877
    A flame gun or blow torch might be your best bet. Or embrace the weedy look and plant to enhance it.
    Tradition is just peer pressure from dead people
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,869
    I sometimes use glyphosphate (e.g. Roundup) to kill perennial weeds in my garden and I also have a grass-munching dog.
    Once glyphosphate is dry it is harmless to animals, and it only takes 20mins to dry. But weeds must be actively growing for it to work, so use between April and Sept.
    Or as WE suggests above, a flame gun, but they don't usually kill the roots so needs to be repeated every now and then.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • glasgowdanglasgowdan Posts: 632
    edited January 2020
    I wouldn't use flame guns as they burn fossil fuel, quite a poor environmental choice, especially factoring in the need for repeat treatments.

    Glyphosate, the basic weedkiller, is what you want. Keep pets away for an hour then get on with life as usual
  • SmudgeriiSmudgerii Posts: 185
    I wouldn't use flame guns as they burn fossil fuel, quite a poor environmental choice, especially factoring in the need for repeat treatments.

    Glyphosate, the basic weedkiller, is what you want. Keep pets away for an hour then get on with life as usual

    Weighed against the impact manufacturing Glyphosate how does the flame gun stack up?

    Or we could go much deeper, what is the overall environmental impact of the manufacture, shipment, use (including other required equipment), waste disposal, residuals etc.

    Although Glyphosate is the better choice for the job, the argument is possibly a poor choice.


  • madpenguinmadpenguin Isle of WightPosts: 2,448
    Smudgerii said:
    I wouldn't use flame guns as they burn fossil fuel, quite a poor environmental choice, especially factoring in the need for repeat treatments.

    Glyphosate, the basic weedkiller, is what you want. Keep pets away for an hour then get on with life as usual

    Weighed against the impact manufacturing Glyphosate how does the flame gun stack up?

    Or we could go much deeper, what is the overall environmental impact of the manufacture, shipment, use (including other required equipment), waste disposal, residuals etc.

    Although Glyphosate is the better choice for the job, the argument is possibly a poor choice.


    I suppose the only way to be truly environmentally friendly is to weed by hand though this is not always practical  :/
    “Every day is ordinary, until it isn't.” - Bernard Cornwell-Death of Kings
  • Smudgerii said:
    I wouldn't use flame guns as they burn fossil fuel, quite a poor environmental choice, especially factoring in the need for repeat treatments.

    Glyphosate, the basic weedkiller, is what you want. Keep pets away for an hour then get on with life as usual

    Weighed against the impact manufacturing Glyphosate how does the flame gun stack up?

    Or we could go much deeper, what is the overall environmental impact of the manufacture, shipment, use (including other required equipment), waste disposal, residuals etc.

    Although Glyphosate is the better choice for the job, the argument is possibly a poor choice.



    I'm well-versed in Environmental Impact Assessments and Life Cycle Analyses... this is my balanced view on things! Given the longer lasting result from weedkiller, the manufacture, transport and disposal of propane cannisters, short-lived results and fuel use, not to mention the labour requirement. 
  •  But weeds must be actively growing for it to work, so use between April and Sept.

    The weeds have been very active over the past 3 months so I'm thinking of applying the glyphosphate now. Being winter will it still be OK for the dog within an hour? If not, how long?
  • It won't be very effective now.... But no harm in doing one now and another in April. 

    Yep, once dry... 
  • TopbirdTopbird Mid SuffolkPosts: 7,588
    Personally, I wouldn’t apply glyphosate now for 2 main reasons:

    1] it is much more effective when weeds are growing strongly (April to Oct).

    2) Glyphosate should not be used if rain is forecast within the next 8 hrs or (I assume) if a heavy dew is likely. Both these things are likely to happen at this time of year.

    As one who tries to use as few chemicals as possible in the garden I only use them under optimal conditions. That way I can use the minimum amount and usually only need one application.
    Heaven is ... sitting in the garden with a G&T and a cat while watching the sun go down
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,869
    I doubt glyphosphate will work this time of year.
    The weeds must be growing actively for it to work - plants are not growing fast enough now.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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