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What Cotoneaster would look good here?

madpenguinmadpenguin Isle of WightPosts: 2,248
I am trying to find a Cotoneaster to go in a raised bed (not yet built) to cover a fence (not mine).The bed is under a cherry tree and will be large enough for a shrub.
I already have
C. dammeri (Streibs Findling)
C. franchettii
C. integrifolius
C. x suecicus (Coral Beauty)
C. horizontalis
in the garden and wanted a different variety.One that like the shade,has larger leaves than C.franchettii and nice berries but that can be kept at a narrow depth of up to 12"-18"
The bed will be where the fern containers are at present.The water butt is going and the patio made level with the other paved areas adjacent to it.
Any ideas of suitable Cotoneaster varieties or indeed any other suitable plants?

“Every day is ordinary, until it isn't.” - Bernard Cornwell-Death of Kings

Posts

  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 26,610
    I'd go with Horizontalis and the some of the others would stick out too much. IMHO dammeri is almost flat, I've never seen it "climb" but I might well be wrong.
    Devon.
  • madpenguinmadpenguin Isle of WightPosts: 2,248
    I know C.horizontalis would be the ideal candidate but I already have 3 in the garden and wanted something a little different!
    “Every day is ordinary, until it isn't.” - Bernard Cornwell-Death of Kings
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 26,610
    I don't know C integrifolius, but Coral Beauty , from memory is more arching and rooting ,rather than "climbing" .
    Devon.
  • madpenguinmadpenguin Isle of WightPosts: 2,248
    My C.dammeri is flat against the back fence but I have let it grow tall and arching above head height.Birds love it!

    “Every day is ordinary, until it isn't.” - Bernard Cornwell-Death of Kings
  • You could try the variegated form of C. horizontalis. 

    Also, I have seen C. lacteus being grown as quite a narrow, tall hedge, though not exactly wall-trained in the way you possibly want.
  • madpenguinmadpenguin Isle of WightPosts: 2,248
    edited December 2019
    A narrow 'hedge' is what I suppose I am looking for.If the fence ever blew down it would be free standing and not relying on the fence for support.
    I think I have seen C. lacteus up the road from me,will have to give it a closer look!
    “Every day is ordinary, until it isn't.” - Bernard Cornwell-Death of Kings
  • yorkshireroseyorkshirerose North YorkshirePosts: 572
    I have Cotoneaster lacteus in a mixed hedge. It's quite  a large shrub, but lovely if you think you have room. It grows quickly but can be pruned to keep it to a reasonable shape, although it's natural habit is to weep. Mine is 4years old, planted as a 3ft shrub and is now approx. 6ft x 4ft
    Excellent plant for bees, butterflies and birds. Evergreen.
    I also have Cotoneaster 'Hybridus Pendulus'. which has been top-grafted to form a small weeping tree, again very good for wildlife
    https://www.rhs.org.uk/plants/4629/Cotoneaster-lacteus/Details
    https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/98472/Cotoneaster-Hybridus-Pendulus/Details



    A gardener's work is never at an end  - (John Evelyn 1620-1706)
  • yorkshireroseyorkshirerose North YorkshirePosts: 572
    I forgot to add photo of Cotoneaster lacteus in my hedge, sorry
    A gardener's work is never at an end  - (John Evelyn 1620-1706)
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