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Is it Chervil or Cicely?

herbaceousherbaceous E. BerksPosts: 2,066
edited December 2019 in Plants
Hi all and Seasons greetings to everyone (as appropriate  ;)  ), I have no wish to start a formal v common name debate but am interested in what people call Myrrhis odorata.

I am making a herb book for my Grandson for Christmas including all the herbs in my garden ( plus a few others - the nine herbs, tisane de quatre herbs and so on) as he is always asking about them and is Harry Potter mad! So it will be a 'Book of Potions' indexed by latin names. I am trying to be as accurate as possible, not an easy task.

Anyway, now on the Ms and Culpepper calls Myrrhis odorata Chervil. I have never come across this although the RHS Herb Dictionary do refer to it as sweet chervil in the list of common names. Is this a common name? I have always known it as Sweet Cicely but have led a sheltered life so would be really interested in what others call it.


"The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett

Posts

  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,160
    Myrrhis odorata, Sweet Cicely, perennial
    Anthricus cereflolium, Chervil, annual

  • herbaceousherbaceous E. BerksPosts: 2,066
    Thank you nutcutlet. My experience exactly, but since my experience is limited its good to know more experienced folk agree.
    "The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett
  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,160
    edited December 2019
    I just had a little look around and wiki referred to 'other plants also called Chervil'. I think it's just another pointer to the uselessness of the common. name :) 
  • herbaceousherbaceous E. BerksPosts: 2,066
    edited December 2019
    The more I refer to my books and try to amalgamate the information with my own experiences and in a form suitable for a 10 year old the more I agree!

    I think I'll just stick with Sweet Cicely. @nutcutlet thank you for taking the time to check it out.
    "The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett
  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen SpainPosts: 4,050
    I didn’t know the answer to your question, Herbaceous, but what a lovely, thoughtful and educational gift. I’m sure your Grandson will be thrilled!
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 23,513
    Sweet Cicely is much taller and more fern like than what we know as chervil which looks more like a small, under nourished parsley with softer leaves.  Sweet Cicely is great for reducing the bitterness or sourness of things like rhubarb and blackcurrants and thus allows you to reduce sugar levels.  Chervil has a mild aniseed flavour and is good with fish and in mixed green salads.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • herbaceousherbaceous E. BerksPosts: 2,066
    Thank you @Nollie, he is being allocated one of my raised beds next year and is already nurturing strawberry plants grown from my runners and lavender from cuttings he has taken! I am very optimistic.

    My understanding exactly @Obelixx (I love rhubarb stewed with sweet cicely!) but when you see these references in books you start to doubt what you know - especially when that ain't much to start with.

    All your comments really appreciated, Chervil is chervil and Cicely is cicely.  I'm on Origanum majorana now, can't wait to reach Urtica!
    "The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 23,513
    We had a chap come to spray our roof tiles against moss and algae one spring and he asked permission to go and pick the new spring shoots of nettles growing in our paddock across the road so he could make his annual spring tonic to clean out his liver.  He popped round every year afterwards.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • herbaceousherbaceous E. BerksPosts: 2,066
    I'm not surprised @Obelixx, they are an antihistamine as well and make your hair shine!  Lucky chap. its not easy to find a plentiful, fresh, clean source for personal use  :)
    "The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 23,513
    We have laods in the paddock here too @herbaceous but it's a long way for a Belgian roof chappy to get his tonic.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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