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Tree Identification

Good Evening.

I have just made an account here to ask a question for all you lovely knowledgeable folk. I have just got the keys to my new house and started to do a bit of work tidying up the garden while we wait for work to finish inside the house. 

There is quite a large tree in our back garden, very close to our house which Im in the process of cutting down for various different reasons. However, before I dispose of all the wood, I wanted to find out if anyone could tell me what type of tree it is first. The reason being is that, if someone can identify the tree, I will check and see if the wood is decent enough to put in our future log burner next winter when the wood has seasoned. Ive tried to identify the tree myself but just ended up getting confused!

Anyway, I have attached some pictures for you all to look at. 

Thank you in advance
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Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 23,540
    I suspect you have been busy butchering a rather fine magnolia which would have had beautiful blooms next spring.

    Clever, artisan wood turners and cabinet makers use the wood for veneers and trim.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Paul B3Paul B3 Posts: 2,912
    Have tried magnifying your picture for more detailed resolution ; didn't work !! :)
    However , it seems to me (maybe) your tree is (or was) a very large Magnolia .
    Perhaps others will agree or disagree .
  • Thank you for your replies! Our surveyor suggested that the location of the tree to our house and drains/pipes, caused him concern as the roots would more than likely damage them over time (if they have not already done so).

    As beautiful as it is in its full glory, I dont want an extremely large repair bill for damaged drainage! 
  • Paul B3Paul B3 Posts: 2,912
    Whoops!!!.....didn't see the reply by Obelixx !
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 23,540
    A pity you didn't ask some gardeners first before wielding your weapons.   House surveyors are not tree experts and will err excessively on the side of caution.

    Magnolias are very low water users and are very unlikely to cause damage.  They also offer shelter and food for some birds and insects so I hope you'll plant something esle to compensate for loss of habitat.

    The RHS offers this advice on trees planted close to buildings.   Do scroll down and read it through - https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=225 
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 5,631
    Obelixx said:
    A pity you didn't ask some gardeners first before wielding your weapons.   House surveyors are not tree experts and will err excessively on the side of caution.
    A lot of surveyors aren't even house experts  :|
  • Obelixx said:
    A pity you didn't ask some gardeners first before wielding your weapons.   House surveyors are not tree experts and will err excessively on the side of caution.

    Magnolias are very low water users and are very unlikely to cause damage.  They also offer shelter and food for some birds and insects so I hope you'll plant something esle to compensate for loss of habitat.

    The RHS offers this advice on trees planted close to buildings.   Do scroll down and read it through - https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=225 
    I understand they arent tree experts and are cautious with their advice. I had a family member that suffered bad damage to drainge from a tree in their back garden years ago, so Im paranoid about the same happening. Dont worry, there are other trees in our garden for habitats :) 

    Hexagon said:
    I’m sad that you’ve chopped down this tree ☹️
    Home insurers will normally ask a question along the lines of “is the property within 5m of a tree that is >10m tall?”
    Not sure how tall your tree is but it looks more than 5m away from the house.
    Im sad to chop it down too, it looks lovely during the spring/summer! The tree is within 5m from our house and sits directly above drainage. As for height, not entitely sure. It seems to be higher than our guttering.
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 5,631
    Just as a general rule it's advised that you live with a mature garden for a year before planning any major work. It allows you to experience it throughout the seasons and lets you know what hidden things might pop up. It's always tempting to start work right away but biding your time can often improve your future plans.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 66,312
    But we are where we are ... the magnolia is going/gone .... now @jordanmcbride93 has a new planting opportunity ... that spot needs a focal point ... just one that's not going to invade drains or get too big ........... helpful suggestions?  :)
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 23,540
    We'd need to know soil type and exposure first @Dovefromabove.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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