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  • I'm sure I'm not the only one who finds some of these Lottery prizes quite obscene.

    I can understand that to win £1 million is probably everyone's dream but surely anything over and above that is completely OTT.  A million quid wisely invested would see most lottery ticket winners set up for life.

    We ought to be thinking of how the excess £'s  could perhaps go to more rewarding causes - there is enough of them including the NHS.

    What I always find amusing is that the winners of these vast sums always say " It won't change my life ".  Who are they kidding ?  Your life is changed the instant that dosh hits your bank account. 

    Rant over............perhaps I should have put this on the Curmudgeon Thread :D  


  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 25,386
    I'm sure I'm not the only one who finds some of these Lottery prizes quite obscene.

    I can understand that to win £1 million is probably everyone's dream but surely anything over and above that is completely OTT.  A million quid wisely invested would see most lottery ticket winners set up for life.

    We ought to be thinking of how the excess £'s  could perhaps go to more rewarding causes - there is enough of them including the NHS.

    What I always find amusing is that the winners of these vast sums always say " It won't change my life ".  Who are they kidding ?  Your life is changed the instant that dosh hits your bank account. 

    Rant over............perhaps I should have put this on the Curmudgeon Thread :D  


    The couple who won about £160m a few years back ended up divorced, so it certainly changed theirs, lol
    The "rationale" seems to be , " the bigger the jackpot, the more tickets get sold so the more money is raised for " good causes" "
    No mention of the increased profits for Camelot or the increase in gambling addiction. 
    "A tax on the stupid and the greedy " is one description . 
    I used to stand at a till every Tuesday and the number of customers I served every week with tickets was breathtaking. 
    Devon.
  • KiliKili Posts: 297
    edited December 2019
    Lizzie27 said:
    If everybody in the country paid £10 for each GP or outpatient visit, then a) they might actually turn up for it and b) it might cut down on the number of unnecessary visits (and I'm specifically not getting at you @Pansyface).
    Hi Lizzie27, the problem with that suggestion is that it wont end there. I live in the channel  Islands and each time I visit a GP it costs £44 also, another £30 if you need a blood test.
    If you want a repeat prescription its £6.50. The only saving grace is prescription medicines are currently free but there's talk of introducing a charge.

    Obviously at these prices nobody books an appointment unless they have to but, conversely many that should make an appointment don't because they cant afford to.

    I'm a firm believer that health care should be free for all. I just wish we had it here.

    Kili

    'The power of accurate observation .... is commonly called cynicism by those that have not got it.

    George Bernard Shaw'

  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Bath, SomersetPosts: 5,356
    I agree with you @Kili, that does sound a bit steep and I'm surprised, there can't be a huge population there. Our prescriptions are dearer, but I was only advocating a small charge for GP/outpatient visits in this country. They could try it as an experiment for a year and see how much it raises.
  • LiriodendronLiriodendron Scariff, County Clare, IrelandPosts: 5,985
    Thanks @Fairygirl - got my energy back now.  Eye is still a bit uncomfortable, but there's nothing earth-shatteringly wrong with it...
    "The one who plants trees, knowing that he will never sit in their shade, has at least started to understand the meaning of life."  Rabindranath Tagore
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 61,588
    edited December 2019
    @Hostafan1 .... a friend on the foodie forum has a dog with  newly diagnosed bile duct/gall bladder problems.  She has just collected the first batch of medication ...  She posted "I was quite amused when reading the patient information leaflet that came with the medication to see that it was actually for humans and used for treating gallstones. Thank goodness for insurance, this episode is a little shy of £1000 and still not fully resolved."

    Thank goodness for the NHS  <3 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 25,386
    @Hostafan1 .... a friend on the foodie forum has a dog with  newly diagnosed bile duct/gall bladder problems.  She has just collected the first batch of medication ...  She posted "I was quite amused when reading the patient information leaflet that came with the medication to see that it was actually for humans and used for treating gallstones. Thank goodness for insurance, this episode is a little shy of £1000 and still not fully resolved."

    Thank goodness for the NHS  <3 
    All my treatment hasn't cost me a penny . 
    I hope those in favour of an insurance based health service read your post.
    Devon.
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 15,977
    I was just reading about dog and cat insurances, as this poster has said, but they don’t always cover everything, shop around for insurance or it could be a waste of money. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 4,977
    From my experience with dog insurance I hope that we never have to have a similar system for humans. I've no doubt that the system is aimed to confuse and stress people so that they pay for a higher premium. The range of cover for various problems, variation in excess charges for different things and additional % charge of the total cost on top, time limits for treatment, treatment that is only covered if you renew with the same insurer next year for an unknown cost, caveats for all kinds of minor things, you could't get a like for like cost comparison if you tried. I've taken a gamble this year and not insured the dog beyond the most minor cover. For a decent cover at his age I'd need to pay about £300 a year with £300 excess on any claim plus a percentage of the vet bills on top. I've put the same money aside to cover any bills though.
  • KT53KT53 Posts: 4,182
    The potential problem with introducing a fee for appointments is that it would need to be at a level where the cost of not attending had a noticeable effect.  That, as others have said, might put people off who genuinely need to see a doctor but can't afford high costs.  Any scheme is likely to have exemptions for those on low income, benefits etc all of which reduce the effect of introducing a charge.
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