The NHS

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  • KT53KT53 Posts: 3,710
    The latest potential problem is GPs effectively ruling out house calls.  Back in 2005 my mother, 86 at the time, was complaining about severe abdominal pain.  My brother phoned the surgery and a doctor came out. She was hospitalised immediately and sadly died from liver cancer just a few days later.  With the current, and new, systems I doubt she would have even seen a doctor before passing away.
  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Bath, SomersetPosts: 3,925
    My sympathies @KT53 - you have been through the mill it seems for a number of years past.
  • NHS or our reliance upon medical services.  No doubt many of us can relate the good experiences and rejoice, also the not so good.  Then we moan.

    I was diagnosed with bladder cancer in 2014.  Having seen blood in my urine, I contacted my GP.  Within less time than it takes to tell.  I had an appointment to see a urologist at the QE Hosp. Woolwich.  The cystoscopy done with and the doctor saying.  Yes! you have bladder cancer.  It was like being slapped across the face with a fresh herring.  The word cancer has become so frightening to many.  Within days I was undergoing sugery in the PRU.  Follow-ups began and continue even now.  My Chief consultant at the QE actually too the hospital to court, due to poor care to patients.  The hospital has improved so much now.  In my case, the cancer has continued to return and back in January 2019.  I had another op.  Then time passed and no news.  I thought I was out of the woods.  My daughter decided to go behind my back and she contacted the hospital. The letter came.  Urgent appointment.   My chief consultant was so full of apologies.  He praised Amanda for her actions.  My case had failed to reach the team's meetings etc.  An internal enquiry is now taking place.

    I have been transferred to Guy's hosp. London.  Also a teaching hosp.  In October I had another op.  A stent was left in my left ureta, as it is thought the cancer cells are starting in the ureter.  My next urology op is Dec. 19. 2019
     Now being under the direct care of GUY's.  There is no messing about here.  They have a special unit for the care of the older persons.  As a result, the Doc; set up an echocardiogram.  This identeified an Aortic problem.   Tomoprrow 5/12/19 I'm seeing the cardiac professor.  Mention has been made of having a bone scan.  So 2014  till now.   I've had around ten cystoscopies and seven or eight ops.  Fair do's.  Yes i have at times had enough, but.  These teams of devoted medics are doing their very best at keeping me alive.
    A downside.  My wife Valerie failed to wake up after open heart surgery 9.6.2010  That ended 49 yrs of happy marriage.  She had been a victim of diabetes 2.  Hospital notes quoted 'badly managed diabetes 2.  What can you do?

    I thank all medical staff past and present for the love, affection and care i have been given.

    I have to say this. Contrary to some opinions.   Our mixed nationality of staf and medical providers.  IMHO these folk are GREAT.  GOD BLESS THEM.
  • Rik56Rik56 WiganPosts: 149
    I just want to say good luck and best wishes to everybody going through treatment.
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 22,786
    This morning I've had a nurse practitioner call to see I'm feeling, I've had the hospital call to give me an ultrasound appt for tomorrow, and another dept have just called to confirm follow up treatment for Husband in two weeks time.
    Devon.
  • granmagranma Posts: 1,833
    The gripe I have with the nhs is confidentiality. After being told my dad had lung cancer and taking into consideration of his long term anxiety problem it was suggested he was not told too much of having  the cancer. This was on his notes etc at the consultants request.
    The family's handling of this terrible life threatening illness was hard but everyone managed to keep it under wraps.  An hour before I'd requested to speak to the doctors in confidence .I was told I couldn't do this without dads permission..dad managed to let it be known he didn't mind. 
    So here's me expecting to talk in confidence out of dads hearing  ,but it wasn't like that.
    Two doctors came to the four bed ward stood at the end of the bed  showing impatient signs asking what did we want to know .? I said I would like a discussion on My dad's condition but in privet. My dad asked what was the huge swelling was  on his back .  Instead of explaining gently  they told him it was the cancer getting bigger.rightly or wrongly this had been kept from him at his GPS request.he knew it would send dad into depths of despire.
    My dad was sent home to finish his days with love of his family around him.  breathing equipment set up 
     he went down hill  fast ,  he was given three weeks. he was with us 2 days. His family doctor of 30yrs  said without doubt  being told he didn't have very long hastened his death.I

    Myself I always thought that requesting a discussion with a doctor was done in private .
    This is my only gripe with our NHS.
  • granmagranma Posts: 1,833
    I hold that guilt today as much as  I did 13 years ago , guilt has never left me that I was the one to hasten dad to lose his will.
     because he knew then he wasn't going to make it.
    While he thought he could conquer the illness  (which is how he had referred to the fact  something being wrong- but not the word cancer ) he had  kept his spirits up. 
    I shall continue to feel I was to blame.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 57,152
    @granma ... I don’t think he ‘gave up’ ... it was a battle he knew he couldn’t win ... he accepted the inevitable ... in his situation I would have welcomed the speedy arrival of the end ... he was with his loved ones ... what good would another three weeks of  increasing pain and suffering have done him or you?

    In your situation I would’ve done as you did. I don’t believe you have anything to blame yourself for and I’m sure your father who loved you would feel the same. 

    You are not guilty ... no one is ... some things cannot be beaten and we just have to accept them ((hugs))
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 22,786
    @granma ... I don’t think he ‘gave up’ ... it was a battle he knew he couldn’t win ... he accepted the inevitable ... in his situation I would have welcomed the speedy arrival of the end ... he was with his loved ones ... what good would another three weeks of  increasing pain and suffering have done him or you?

    In your situation I would’ve done as you did. I don’t believe you have anything to blame yourself for and I’m sure your father who loved you would feel the same. 

    You are not guilty ... no one is ... some things cannot be beaten and we just have to accept them ((hugs))
    I concur 100% 
    Please don't "beat yourself up about it" @[email protected].
    Devon.
  • KT53KT53 Posts: 3,710
    edited December 2019
    Lizzie27 said:
    My sympathies @KT53 - you have been through the mill it seems for a number of years past.
    We've had our share, that's for sure.  Dealings with hospitals have all been good, it's the GP side of things which is simply not working as it should, at least at our surgery.
    We did have one ridiculous situation with a hospital appointment.  My wife was told that the only appointment available was at a hospital some 20 miles away, which was no great problem for us as we have transport.  When the consultant arrived she checked the notes and informed my wife that she couldn't do the tests there as this was a small hospital and didn't have the specialist equipment required.  The consultant was actually based at our local hospital and had driven to the other site just to see 2 patients, both of whom lived close to her base.  She had effectively wasted half a day!  plus having to see both patients again.
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