8 Large holes in raised flower beds

jasminebcjasminebc MK45 3, Bedford, Bedfordshire, United KingdomPosts: 4
Hi, 

Recently I have noticed a number of holes, about the size of a fist around my flower beds.  Some just go in and out right next to each other, some are going under fences, and some have created a tunnel. There are no droppings and only one of the holes had a fan shape so I assumed a rat.

I need to add that I have 2 dogs and it's definitely not them digging.  I have cameras but the holes are unfortunately out of sight.  I have also bought a rat cage and have caught plenty of mice, probably the same one over and over but it's tiny compared to the holes.  I also caught a rat a few weeks ago, however I drove it 10 miles away to let it loose away from the house but the holes keep appearing even though I'm filling them back up.

Does anyone have any other ideas of what it may be or what I can do? 

Posts

  • PosyPosy Posts: 1,653
    I'm afraid that rats are the most likely culprits. It looks like you have some lovely shelter for them, there. Do you feed the birds, too?
  • jasminebcjasminebc MK45 3, Bedford, Bedfordshire, United KingdomPosts: 4
    Ah man... Yes I feed the birds, we have plenty of trees and it's a new build so I wanted to bring the wildlife back . 
  • jasminebcjasminebc MK45 3, Bedford, Bedfordshire, United KingdomPosts: 4
    Any suggestions as to what I can do? 
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 14,745
    We just pour rat bait down the holes and cover with a slate so nothing else can eat it. Look in a day or two, if it’s gone you need to add more until there is some left. 
    The only one we find that works these days is Neosorexa, available from large farm shop/stores, or maybe eBay. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 27,004
    I'd agree. Rats.
    There's never just 'a rat' unfortunately.  :/
    Sometimes with new builds, and indeed when any other new construction or similar happens, it disturbs them from their little habitat. The attraction of bird feed is also hard for them to resist. 
    If you don't want to tackle it yourself, it's better to conatct your council. Perhaps other neighbours have noticed some activity too, so it may be worth asking around, although soem people might be horrified!
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • The usual advice from any Pest Control officer is to first stop feeding the birds for a period and clean up any old seed spillage - annoying, particularly at this time of year but makes sense. Obviously neighbouring properties would have to follow the same regime.
    If there are no signs after a couple of weeks, feeding can resume but you need to be vigilant.  It is a good idea to contact your local authority and seek advice anyway if only to make sure that they are aware of the problem.
    Just a thought but I wouldn't advertise the fact that you are catching and releasing rats whether it be 1 mile or 10 miles distant :)
     
  • jasminebcjasminebc MK45 3, Bedford, Bedfordshire, United KingdomPosts: 4
    Thank you @philippa smith2.  Everything on Google said to catch them and release well away from property hence why I did it, but luckily just the once.  I'll contact the council 😊
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