Bare root Kniphofia

I've just received a late delivery of bare root Kniphofia which I would have planted in October if they had arrived on time. But now the ground is very wet and the first frosts have started (29 Nov 19). Should I plant them in the ground now? If not, what should I do with the plants over winter?
«1

Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 27,004
    Just put them in pots for now. They'll be fine  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • In pots in a sheltered place in the garden? In a cold frame? Or in the cool garage? I don't have a greenhouse.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 27,004
    Just anywhere really - tucked against a wall, or in amongst shrubs etc, if you're worried about them freezing, but to be honest - they're tough.
    I have loads of little perennial plants in 3 inch pots which are just against a wall. I've already lost count of the number of frosts they've been exposed to in the least 2 months - over 20 at least.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Thanks Fairygirl. Very helpful
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 27,004
    No probs @mikesims. It's also worth labelling them - so that you don't forget what they are. Not that I ever do that of course  ;)

    I've just remembered I have one sitting around in a 6 inch pot awaiting replanting too.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Should I water them in the pots or just leave them in dry compost?
  • AstroAstro Posts: 101
    I got some bare root kniphofia last year and potted them up, as pointed out they are tough plants. I'd imagine unless they freeze solid nothing else will kill them off , personally I'd leave them exposed to the rain.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 27,004
    There's probably enough moisture over winter to keep them right, so I wouldn't worry too much.Water after you pot them up, and then let them get on with it  :)  
    If you have them in a position where they get no direct rain, and you live in a very dry area, just keep an eye on them in dry spells. 
    We don't need to worry about that here, as there's always a lot of moisture in the air to keep pots damp enough. 

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • I twist mine up and make a bun with it. I read to do that to protect the crown. Then in the spring I cut it all off
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 27,004
    stanliv95 said:
    I twist mine up and make a bun with it. 
    Just leaving the foliage does the same job - no effort required  :)
    They don't need much protection anyway - they're very tough plants. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


Sign In or Register to comment.