Forum home Problem solving

Complete novice ruining new lawn

2»

Posts

  • mr197mr197 Posts: 11
    Hostafan1 said:
    I know we've had a lot of rain, but it looks waterlogged. Might just be a trick of the photos though.
    Thank you.  It may well be; so squishy underfoot.
  • mr197mr197 Posts: 11
    Hostafan1 said:
    If it was my garden, I'd lose the "lawn" altogether and have more planting and a central paved, woodchipped, gravel area in the middle
    Thank you.  That's kind-of how the previous owners had it - with ponds and a lot of stone.  We didn't have a conversation about why.  We've got a little one so couldn't leave like that, and it's his first garden, hence my concern.
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 33,337
    IMHO "lawns" are often more bother than they're worth in small gardens.
    Devon.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,208
    I think you had your answer when you said the previous owners didn't have a lawn!
    It does appear to be heavily shaded which makes it trickier. If you're desperate for a lawn of some kind, you may have to raise the area.
    That still creates a problem if it's shady, as it'll never be a brilliant surface, but even moss is fine for kids to play on.  ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • As a few have said, I reckon leaving it until spring will be best. It's amazing how well grass can recver from damage. 

    It may be best to get someone in to dig/lay a sump with a couple of drainage channels in the spring/summer.

    Were the ponds definitely removed, liners removed/totally shredded? 

    We moved home with a 2 year old and one on the way. The first thing I did was dig them a good big pond to stare at and watch the bugs.
  • mr197mr197 Posts: 11
    Fairygirl said:
    I think you had your answer when you said the previous owners didn't have a lawn!
    It does appear to be heavily shaded which makes it trickier. If you're desperate for a lawn of some kind, you may have to raise the area.
    That still creates a problem if it's shady, as it'll never be a brilliant surface, but even moss is fine for kids to play on.  ;)
    Thank you.  Will consider moss if needed!
  • mr197mr197 Posts: 11
    Hazel-1 said:
    @mr197, you’re very welcome. Try not to over worry yourself about it. You will have a much better idea of what’s what when the Spring arrives.
     You can then see how the grass fares, if it’s still abit waterlogged, just (garden )fork it and put some garden sand down the holes. Failing all that, I think the idea of cutting the corner of grass out( we did that) and covering the soil with mulch, gravel, anything to your taste, or just leaving the soil bare and planting put some nice plants, is all a good plan.
    Us gardeners ( unfortunately!) have to exercise patience in new garden, to first , get a lay of the land, see where the sun travels during the day and plan out a new garden accordingly.Give it time. 
    It's very much a learning experience (including the need for patience).  Am learning a lot just from these exchanges. Thank you.
  • mr197mr197 Posts: 11
    As a few have said, I reckon leaving it until spring will be best. It's amazing how well grass can recver from damage. 

    It may be best to get someone in to dig/lay a sump with a couple of drainage channels in the spring/summer.

    Were the ponds definitely removed, liners removed/totally shredded? 

    We moved home with a 2 year old and one on the way. The first thing I did was dig them a good big pond to stare at and watch the bugs.
    Thank you.  That all may not be lost is good to hear.  Fingers crossed.  Will look at the sump/channels idea when it gets warmer.

    100% that ponds and all related materials were removed - it really wasn't a child friendly garden before and from what the neighbours have said much of it was storage until just before it went on the market.
Sign In or Register to comment.