New Build - Ideas Welcome

2

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  • Rik56Rik56 WiganPosts: 156
    The thing with asking such a question is you will get a lot of good suggestions - which is great - but I would compile a list of things you want from "your" garden.
    eg..
    How much time will you spend in it?... will you actually do any "gardening"?
    Do you want to entertain or will it be a private space you can relax in?
    Will it be used by pets or kids?
    What style of garden do you like?
    Whats your budget?
    Give yourself 6 to 8 months to think about what you'd prefer.. have a walk around the local area to see what grows well & perhaps talk to neighbours with established gardens?
    In that time note how wet or dry it becomes & see where the light falls.

    I would be chomping at the bit to get going too but try and resist so whatever you decide wont disappoint you later on (or waste time & money).

  • Hexagon said:
    What kind of plants did they put in your front garden?
    Oh and re: bulbs, I saw some reduced alliums in morrisons for £1 (down from £2), might be worth a look.
    My best efforts of ID'ing them:

    About 12 Photinia  Red Robin 
    3 Cordyline Australis
    And a cluster of some large leaved glossy evergreens that I can't ID and don't really like. 

    I was thinking it was a maybe a little too late for bulbs? Regardless I dug up all my Allium bulbs and potted them for winter before I left my old house. Think I have 50ish already.
  • Rik56 said:
    The thing with asking such a question is you will get a lot of good suggestions - which is great - but I would compile a list of things you want from "your" garden.
    eg..
    How much time will you spend in it?... will you actually do any "gardening"?
    Do you want to entertain or will it be a private space you can relax in?
    Will it be used by pets or kids?
    What style of garden do you like?
    Whats your budget?
    Give yourself 6 to 8 months to think about what you'd prefer.. have a walk around the local area to see what grows well & perhaps talk to neighbours with established gardens?
    In that time note how wet or dry it becomes & see where the light falls.

    I would be chomping at the bit to get going too but try and resist so whatever you decide wont disappoint you later on (or waste time & money).

    True.

    I think visiting mature gardens is probably the best idea. It's the little things i'm unsure on e.g.

    I would like to under plant my collection of japanese maples with snowdrops to create an dwarf forest effect in a shady corner. But once the snowdrops disapear, the effect would to and I'm not quite knowledgeable enough to know what people usually use to fill the void after early flowering bulbs.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 27,021
    Look aorund your area to see what grows well too.
    This is the ideal time of year to 'make plans'. People often jump in and start creating, without thinking about the important, everyday stuff. You don't want it to become a chore to maintain if you have a busy lifestyle.
    The soil will probably be rubbish too, so it's always worth improving any areas you dig out for planting, before you get to the stage of buying plants or sowing seed.  :)

    I'd also say that if you decide to have a pond - site it near the house. It gives a nice focal point and viewpoint from the house through winter, especially when those birds start arriving  ;)  
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Bath, SomersetPosts: 3,934
    I think Japanese maples look best on their own, but agree that snowdrops would look good underneath if you can get them established (don't buy them as bulbs but as plants either in flower or just after). Possibly some ferns? 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 27,021
    Hakenochloas look great with Acers, especially the dark ones.

    They grow in shade/sun, wet/dry - anywhere really. They'd come into growth after the snowdrops [around May here] so they'll help hide the dying foliage of the snowdrops, but they stay looking good right through autumn, so you'd get a good display with the acer colours and their foliage together.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • FireFire LondonPosts: 5,516
    I would deep some deep holes and see what the ground is made of - if you have much topsoil, how it drains. The nature of the ground may well determine what you do with it.
  • Fire said:
    I would deep some deep holes and see what the ground is made of - if you have much topsoil, how it drains. The nature of the ground may well determine what you do with it.
    6 inches of top soil 
    Then compacted clay (building machines rolling over it)and rubble 

  • amancalledgeorgeamancalledgeorge South LondonPosts: 546
    You will have a lot of soil improvement to do in the future...amazing how the developers are allowed to do this. It's not a sustainable depth for long-term gardening. 
    To Plant a Garden is to Believe in Tomorrow
  • You will have a lot of soil improvement to do in the future...amazing how the developers are allowed to do this. It's not a sustainable depth for long-term gardening. 
    My last place was worse.

    The clay here isn't as heavy and the rubble doesn't seem to be as bad (fingers crossed). At my last house, anything below 6 inches required a pick axe and I eventually just gave up.

    My plan of action is to make my designs by mid March (I don't think I could go a summer living in the garden without making a start), then bring in a mini digger to break up the soil in any planting borders, mix well with manure (I have 3 black bins of horse manure kept aside) and then purchase a few thousand liters of loam to top.

    I liked the idea of a bog garden to soak any over spill from a pond running towards the house. I'm fairly sure that I won't even need liner with how the clay is holding moisture at the minute.
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