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parakeets

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  • The appearance of these birds is a result of human negligence over a period of time.  They enjoy city/town living but are now spreading further afield.  The changing weather patterns give them a better toe ( claw ? ) hold in what would have been previously unsuitable areas.  I would imagine also that as we become keener on providing our garden birds with food all year round, the parakeets also find that to their advantage.
    It's not that long ago that the Ninja Turtle fad was alive and well - as are many of the Red eared terrapins which were dumped in local waterways when their owners realised that they actually needed to care for them.
    We are ( or at least should be ) far better informed these days so don't even have the excuse of our Victorian forebears who introduced endless exotics both plant and animal. 
    Rant over :)  
  • dave125dave125 Posts: 155
    I was in London over the weekend and it was full of them. We literally heard them everywhere we went. They blended into the trees surpisingly well. When the cannon went off by the cenotaph at 11.00 about 20 flew from seemingly nowhere directly toward Her Majesty!
    Don't worry too much about their impact, everything has an impact on everything else at some level and if you moan too much about it the daily mail picks it up and people start to believe that killing the entire species is a good idea - seriously it's happened before and is happening now with other birds.
    Luv Dave
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 4,917
    We are ( or at least should be ) far better informed these days so don't even have the excuse of our Victorian forebears who introduced endless exotics both plant and animal.
    The exotic pet and plant trade is worse than ever and fuelled by the internet for both fads and easy access to illegal sales. Look at how bad places like Florida are getting now for invasive species. We're just lucky to have a climate that keeps numbers down.
  • We are ( or at least should be ) far better informed these days so don't even have the excuse of our Victorian forebears who introduced endless exotics both plant and animal.
    The exotic pet and plant trade is worse than ever and fuelled by the internet for both fads and easy access to illegal sales. Look at how bad places like Florida are getting now for invasive species. We're just lucky to have a climate that keeps numbers down. 
    I agree wholeheartedly - CITES is useless in these days of globalisation.  It also doesn't help that many exotics are now bred in the UK and are therefore legally allowed to be sold without restriction.  I'm talking mostly about animal species but it's really the same for plants too.  Import checks for both are only as good as those on the front line. Whatever successive governments claim, this particular issue is way down on any agenda.
    I could go on...............but better not >:)
  • B3B3 Posts: 13,191
    The trouble is, they're not stupid like pigeons. One has worked out how to circumvent the spring loaded squirrel proof effort that I have in my garden. I had to shake the washing line to dislodge it.
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • madpenguinmadpenguin Isle of WightPosts: 2,007
    I sometimes find it strange that we view parakeets as pests rather than a species that has successfully found a niche for itself.
    The Collared Dove only arrived here in the UK in the 1950's and has around 990,000 breeding pairs.
    The Ring Necked Parakeet only started breeding here in 1969 and has 8,600 breeding pairs.
    Maybe we just notice the parakeets because they are bright green and noisy?
    “Every day is ordinary, until it isn't.” - Bernard Cornwell-Death of Kings
  • B3 said:
    The trouble is, they're not stupid like pigeons. One has worked out how to circumvent the spring loaded squirrel proof effort that I have in my garden. I had to shake the washing line to dislodge it.
    Depends what you actually mean by "stupid" I suppose - stupid as we use it doesn't realistically apply to nature.  Pigeons have thrived - we help them do so by our own actions - they are smart birds in reality and we have used them to our benefit at times (carrier pigeons which were honored for their actions in WW2 ). 
    Seems to me we are rather quick to lay the blame for our own shortcomings on someone/something else.  Much like politics - all what the "others" did / didn't do, etc. whilst the "we" of course are perfect........... o:)
     
  • ElothirElothir Posts: 76
    edited November 2019
    As far as whether they're having an impact on other birds, they obviously are even if it's simply the matter of a Parakeet eating a fallen apple means another, native bird or animal can't eat that apple.

    That said, they've been here quite awhile, and short of a massive cull are not going anywhere. 

    I have heard that they can be a negative impact on other birds just because of their size and raucous calls are intimidating to native birds but from the little I've seen of them alongside other birds at least Pigeons, Magpies, Crows and Seagulls (funnily enough our native 'pests') don't seem to care, but then here we only have relatively few of them compared to the hundreds further into London. I imagine Robins and other smaller birds would avoid them, but then they tend to avoid everything anyway. Certainly in our garden if a Robin is happily hopping along the path and a Pigeon shows up the Robin vanishes.

    On the flip side I have heard that our native birds of prey don't seem averse to going after them either so there's pluses and minuses all over.
  • Chris_NChris_N Posts: 27
    Pests in my neighbourhood - have just seen them take every apple off of two trees in my neighbours garden in under two days.
  • Daisyx3Daisyx3 Posts: 1
    Does anyone have any idea how to stop them eating all the apples in our trees? We haven't had a single apple to eat from the trees in the last three years! We weren't sure if it was the parakeets or not until we ended up at home all the time this year with lockdown and could see what they were doing! We've removed the bird feeder that was initially attracting them, and hung old CDs and a child's windmill in one tree, but it doesn't seem to have stopped them at all.
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