Broken hydrangea stem/branch

Mike176Mike176 Posts: 3
Hello to all on the GW forum, hope you are well and can offer a bit of advice to a first-time poster and absolute novice in the garden.
I noticed a damaged stem/branch on my fledging hydrangea so I have cut it off and placed it in water in the hope I can buy some time and see if any of you can let me know if I can re-plant the stem/branch (see attached photo). I’ve noticed there are some healthy looking buds on it still but this may not count for much.
Also, should I cover the exposed part of the branch where I made the cut (see attached photo) so as to protect it over the winter?
I am grateful for any advice at all.
All my very best
Mike

Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 26,992
    Hi @Mike176- the stem is no use now, so just enjoy it in the house, although if you cut all the top growth off down to a joint, and cut the bottom just below a joint, leaving a section of around four or five inches, and leave it in the water, it may produce some roots, and that can then be potted up and grown on.
    No need to do anything to the remaining shrub. It'll be fine.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 56,632
    Further to @Fairygirl ‘s mention of rooting a cutting in water, you may find this thread interesting https://forum.gardenersworld.com/discussion/1004868/plants-that-root-in-water/p1
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Bee witchedBee witched Scottish BordersPosts: 469
    Hello @Mike176,

    What you have there is ideal material for making a hardwood cutting ... see this link for how to do it.

    https://www.gardenersworld.com/how-to/grow-plants/how-to-take-hardwood-cuttings/

    So, if you fancy having a second hydrangea, why not give it a try.

    Bee x
      image  Bees must gather nectar from two million flowers to make one pound of honey 
  • Mike176Mike176 Posts: 3
    Dear Fairygirl, Dovefromabove & Bee, 

    Thank you so very much for taking the time to reply and offer those suggestions - all of which I shall follow.

    Sincere thanks again
    Mike
  • glasgowdanglasgowdan Posts: 570
    It's just a stem. The rootball won't be affected and the plant will grow fine come the spring
  • Mike176Mike176 Posts: 3
    Cheers for that glasgowdan - it’s a relief to hear 
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